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In the News - Archives: 2011-07


Below is a list of articles, with summary, about Indian residentials schools, the IAP and other related news.

Please follow the link to the original story for the complete article.

This information may not be available in your language of choice as it comes from third party sources.

Articles

Community comes together helps find healing

Published: July  29, 2011 - Added: July  29, 2011 - Publication: paNOW.com

Link http://www.panow.com/node/105575


Community Events

Published: July  27, 2011 - Added: July  28, 2011 - Publication: Sault This Week

Link http://www.saultthisweek.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3232418

NO CHOICES/DIFFERENT VOICES THEATRE: No Choices....Different Voices is an original collective production about Indian Residential Schools based on research from Shingwauk Residential School Centre located at Algoma University and the personal family stories of the artists in the collective.

This multi-art creation explores the stereotypes and realities of Canada's relationship with First Nations by examining different perspectives of a variety of individuals connected with the residential school system. These perspectives include the stories of youth and elders from both past and present.


Métis Nation Youth gather for Leadership Camp on Residential, Boarding and Day Schools (Press Release)

Published: July  24, 2011 - Added: July  28, 2011 - Publication: Métis Nation web site

Link http://www.metisnation.ca/index.php/news/metis-nation-youth-gather-for-leadership-camp-on-residential-boarding-and-day-schools

Saskatoon, SK – (July 24, 2011) Twenty-Five youth from across the Métis Nation Homeland gathered in Saskatoon for a Méits Youth Leadership Camp which focused on the Legacy of Residential Schools and its impact on our Families and Communities. The four-day camp was hosted at the historical site of Batoche, during the Back to Batoche Days. The goal of the leadership camp was to combine social networking tools and resources to ‘share the story’ of the Residential, Boarding and Day School experiences through the development of a social media framework which will be implemented by the Métis National Council to inform the public.


Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations Executive Communiqué - Indian Residential Schools Secretariat Update

Published: July  22, 2011 - Added: July  28, 2011 - Publication: Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations web site

Link http://www.fsin.com/index.php/communiques/650-fsin-executive-communique-july-22-2011-.html

One of activities of the IRS Secretariat, within the resources it has, is to keep abreast of the implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement which was authorized by the courts in 2007.


Residential schools' legacy still haunts: Gerry Kelly, residential consultant, says the family is where children learn who to trust

Published: July  22, 2011 - Added: July  22, 2011 - Publication: Western Catholic Reporter

Link http://wcr.ab.ca/WCRThisWeek/Stories/tabid/61/entryid/1260/Default.aspx

ST. ALBERT — The residential school system was a systemic sin that cannot be understood as separate from a broader colonial reality, says Gerry Kelly, a consultant on the residential school settlement.

Stressing that Canada's residential school system was entrenched in Canada's social policy, Kelly said, "We have to realize that we are dealing with a structural harm."

Kelly, consultant to the Corporation of Catholic Entities Party to the Indian Residential Schools' Settlement, was one of several speakers at the fourth annual Directions in Aboriginal Ministry Conference at Star of the North Retreat Centre.

Some 40 aboriginal people and others involved in aboriginal ministry attended the July 10-15 event sponsored by the Western Catholic Bishops.


History and forgiveness highlight national TRC event

Published: July  21, 2011 - Added: July  22, 2011 - Publication: CJCD Mix 100 News

Link http://www.mix100.ca/news_and_sports/news/Local/11/07/21/History-and-forgiveness-highlight-national-TRC-event

Yellowknife, N.W.T. - Hundreds tell stories of abuse and neglect at residential schools, a legacy that many describe as an attempt to wipe away aboriginal culture.

The chair of Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Commission, Justice Murray Sinclair said healing isn't just about forgiving the churches and government for what happened, it's also about survivors asking their families for forgiveness.

It’s something he witnessed at the national event in Inuvik.


In conversation: Shawn Atleo - On moving beyond residential schools, overcoming cynicism and trusting the Tories

Published: July  20, 2011 - Added: July  22, 2011 - Publication: Macleans

Link http://www2.macleans.ca/2011/07/20/on-moving-beyond-residential-schools-overcoming-cynicism-and-trusting-the-tories/

AFTER TWO YEARS as national chief of the Assembly of First Nations, Shawn Atleo is cautiously optimistic about the relationship he is forging with Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s Conservative government. On Tuesday, at the assembly’s annual meeting in Moncton, N.B., he proposed replacing the federal Aboriginal Affairs Department with a system that allows bands more autonomy and lessens the heavy federal intervention required under the Indian Act. “The patterns of the past have to be essentially smashed,” he told Maclean’s. Atleo, a hereditary chief in the tiny B.C. island community of Ahousaht, reads vindication in the recent report by now-retired auditor general Sheila Fraser. It warns, as Atleo and successive national chiefs have said, that the quality of life on reserves is worsening and the existing system of financing and accountability must be overhauled.


Courts: Indian Residential Schools Settlement Update for July 20, 2011

Published: July  20, 2011 - Added: July  21, 2011 - Publication: Nation Talk.ca

Link http://http://www.nationtalk.ca/modules/news/article.php?storyid=45467


Aboriginals try to reconnect with a stolen past

Published: July  14, 2011 - Added: July  20, 2011 - Publication: Catholic Registrar

Link http://www.catholicregister.org/canada/aboriginals-try-to-reconnect-with-a-stolen-past

INUVIK, N.W.T. — Pictures tell stories. Stories tell us who we are. For 15-year-old Mary Masazumi the story falls into the category of mystery.

Her father Alfred is dead and there are no family photo albums at home in Fort Good Hope that stretch back into her father’s childhood. Mary hoped to fill that gap pouring through binders of photos from the archives of the diocese of Mackenzie-Fort Smith. The diocese came to Inuvik for the Northern National Event of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada June 28 to July 1 with as many photos of students as could be found. Visitors could take home up to five copies. The photos were the most popular attraction outside the commission hearings.


Native confusion (Letter to the Editor)

Published: July  19, 2011 - Added: July  19, 2011 - Publication: Ottawa Sun

Link http://www.ottawasun.com/2011/07/18/letters-to-the-editor-july-19-3

I'm confused by Hans Sanders' response to the editorial "Aboriginals in prison need help," July 16. First, the editorial notes that Harper apologized on behalf of the Canadian government, yet Sanders states Canadians are being blamed "for trying to integrate these people into Canadian society." Does he mean the Canadian government and its policies and the Canadian people are one and the same? Or is he saying he agrees with the residential school system? If the answer to either of these questions is Yes, then he must accept blame for the past marginalization of aboriginal people in this country and all that entails. That (aboriginal people) "already enjoy the most privileged life among Canadians" is a ridiculous claim. How does he define privilege? Finally, why does he compare immigrants to this country's first peoples? All non-aboriginal citizens are immigrants here. Has he considered how he and his children might fare and what rights he might try to protect if a foreign nation took over this country today, separating his children from him so they could be assimilated into the new society?

MARY ELLEN REID

(We confess to being a tad perplexed ourselves, but people born in Canada aren't "immigrants")


Canada's stolen generations speak out

Published: July  19, 2011 - Added: July  19, 2011 - Publication: Australian Broadcasting Corporation News

Link http://www.abc.net.au/news/2011-07-19/canada-stolen-generation-speaks-out/2799630

An Australian delegation is learning how Canada has tried to right some of the wrongs done to its native people.

In the community of Inuvik, more than 1,000 people have gathered to tell their stories to a Truth and Reconciliation Commission.


Our Truth: The Youth Perspective on Residential Schools

Published: July  19, 2011 - Added: July  19, 2011 - Publication: Vimeo Video

Link http://vimeo.com/26588885

Two youth, Marlisa Brown and Molly Tilden, have posted a video with their thoughts on racism in general and residential schools in particular.  This ten-minute short is related to a longer video the two students produced that was first shown at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Northern National Event in Inuvik (June 2011).


Aboriginal healing walk reaches Ottawa

Published: July  15, 2011 - Added: July  18, 2011 - Publication: CBC.ca

Link http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/story/2011/07/15/ott-walk-aboriginals-healing236.html

Five aboriginal men are taking part in a 7,000-kilometre walk together across Canada to create a network of healing they hope will spread to others who endured traumatic childhoods growing up in residential schools.

The group arrived in Ottawa Friday, where Parliament Hill was just one landmark before the halfway mark of an epic journey.


Mixed experiences at Indian residential school

Published: July  14, 2011 - Added: July  18, 2011 - Publication: Anglican Journal.com

Link http://www.anglicanjournal.com/nc/news-update-items/article/mixed-experiences-at-indian-residential-school-9923.html

Inuvik— Attending an Indian residential school gave Lydia Mamakwa the faith that led to her calling as an Anglican priest, and later, as area bishop of northern Ontario in the diocese of Keewatin. But, at one point, it had also left her confused about her identity as a native person.

“My experience (at residential school) was more good than bad,” said Bishop Mamakwa, who attended the Poplar Hill School in northwestern Ontario, which was administered by the Mennonite-associated Northern Gospel Light Mission. 

Bishop spoke to the Anglican Journal about her experiences at the school, when she participated in the National Northern event of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) here June 27 to July 1.


Canada Needs Reckoning with Continued Impact of Residential Schools

Published: July  14, 2011 - Added: July  18, 2011 - Publication: International Centre for Transitional Justice web site

Link http://ictj.org/news/canada-needs-reckoning-continued-impact-residential-schools

“Residential schools affected everything about how we live. They targeted and destroyed our strong family unit, the basic foundation of our communities. They destroyed the glue that holds us together—love, respect and sharing.” These words, spoken by Charlie Furlong, a community leader of the Gwich'in people of Canada’s Northwest Territories, sum up the chilling legacy of the country’s policy of forced assimilation of indigenous cultures implemented through a system of Indian Residential Schools (IRS) from the 1870s to 1998.


Crime, punishment and solutions that work (Letter to the Editor)

Published: July  16, 2011 - Added: July  18, 2011 - Publication: Thunder Bay Chronicle-Journal

Link http://www.chroniclejournal.com/editorial/letters/2011-07-16/crime-punishment-and-solutions-work

Re Crime — letters, July 11, 13:

An anonymous writer argues that we should look at the facts, attribute crime to the “native crime wave” and “make the punishment fit the crime.” Good advice, short-sighted, and non-productive, respectively.

Facts (2008-2009) are that Thunder Bay’s non-violent crime is down by two per cent, car theft is down 23 per cent, break and enter down 16 per cent, robbery down one per cent; however, violent crime is up 17 per cent and homicide is up five per cent.

A significant portion of the issue of aboriginal crime should be recognized for what it is — the product of our secular social policy (initiated by our federal government, implemented by some religious and secular institutes). Close to a century was spent attempting cultural genocide. We live with the aftermath of our own society’s actions.


Indian Residential School Settlement Update for July 13, 2011

Published: July  13, 2011 - Added: July  14, 2011 - Publication: The First Perspective

Link http://www.firstperspective.ca/releases/2676-indian-residential-school-settlement-update-for-july-13-2011.html


Documentary asks hard questions, gets hard answers

Published: July  13, 2011 - Added: July  14, 2011 - Publication: Anglican Journal.com

Link http://www.anglicanjournal.com/nc/news-update-items/article/documentary-asks-hard-questions-gets-hard-answers-9921.html

Inuvik—“What’s that?” “Not interested.” “I don’t know anything about that.”

When two Yellowknife teenagers asked youth in their community what they knew about the experiences of aboriginal people in residential schools, these were the common responses they got.

Marlisa Brown and Molly Tilden captured these responses in a searing documentary that they showed at the Northern Event of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) held here June 27 to July 1.


A project of heart: Elizabeth Wyn Wood Alternative School teacher nominated for Governor General's award

Published: July  13, 2011 - Added: July  14, 2011 - Publication: Ottawa Citizen

Link http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/todays-paper/project%20heart/5093144/story.html


South Dakota Boarding School Survivors Detail Sexual Abuse

Published: July  13, 2011 - Added: July  14, 2011 - Publication: Indian Country Today Media Network.com

Link http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2011/07/south-dakota-boarding-school-survivors-detail-sexual-abuse/

The Dakota expression for child, wakan injan, can be translated as “they too are sacred,” according to Glenn Drapeau, Ihanktonwan Dakota and a member of the Elk Soldier Society on the Yankton Sioux Reservation in South Dakota. “To us, children are as pure as the holy moving energy of the universe, and we treat them that way,” he says.

When Native children arrived at Holy Rosary Mission, founded in 1888 at Pine Ridge to help in the conversion of the Oglala Lakota, nuns staffing the school described them as having good “morals” and giving “a tenth of the trouble white children cause,” Raymond A. Bucko wrote in Lakotas, Black Robes, and Holy Women (University of Nebraska Press, 2000). Nevertheless, corporal punishment was meted out at Holy Rosary—“apparently without scruple,” according to Bucko—and was an important part of the effort to cut the children off from their parents, their language and their culture.

Below, former students recall their experiences.


Anglican exhibit elicits heartfelt response

Published: July  11, 2011 - Added: July  12, 2011 - Publication: Anglican Journal.com

Link http://www.anglicanjournal.com/nc/news-update-items/article/anglican-exhibit-elicits-heartfelt-response-9917.html

General Synod archivist Nancy Hurn had debated whether to display the portraits of Indian residential school students at an exhibit at the Northern National Event of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) of Canada, held June 27 to July, in Inuvik.

Hurn wasn’t sure what kind of reaction the portraits might elicit, but after some consultation, she decided to set them up on a black board as part of the collection that the Anglican Church of Canada—which ran 11 of 14 schools in the North—shared with students and the public.

Then, she said, an “astonishing” thing happened. “Someone came along and began to identify the (students) in the photographs,” who had already passed away, said Hurn. “There were four in one row—two had died by suicide, one by drowning, and one of cancer.”  

That person, a former student himself, had written the information on tiny yellow Post-its and affixed them to the photographs. Hurn said she was going to type the information “out of respect for the people and the images,” but before she could do that, along came other students, who also began identifying individuals in the photographs.

The Post-its, said Hurn, “made people feel free to change the spelling of their names or other students’ names. People felt very engaged in the exhibit, in the material, in a way that I’ve never experienced before as an archivist.”


Yukon First Nations want apology from truth panel

Published: July  11, 2011 - Added: July  12, 2011 - Publication: CBC.ca

Link http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/story/2011/07/11/trc-inuvik-yukon-apology.html

Yukon First Nations want an apology from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission for the accommodations it offered to residential school survivors in Inuvik, N.W.T. last month.

More than 30 Yukoners were among the 1,000-plus delegates to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's second national event in Inuvik, N.W.T., from June 28 to July 1.

More than 30 Yukon delegates attended the commission's national event in the Mackenzie Delta community, from June 28 to July 1, in the hopes of sharing their residential school experiences with the federally appointed panel.

But delegates claimed they were subjected to filthy, unsafe and uncomfortable accommodations that had broken windows, no telephones and dirty water.


Le PM est nommé chef honoraire de la Première Nation des Blood d’Alberta

Published: July  11, 2011 - Added: July  12, 2011 - Publication: Communiqué du BPM

Link http://pm.gc.ca/fra/media.asp?category=1&featureId=6&pageId=26&id=4197

Aujourd’hui, le Premier ministre Stephen Harper a été nommé chef honoraire de la tribu des Blood d’Alberta.

Le titre de chef honoraire a été demandé par le chef de la tribu des Blood d’Alberta Charles Weasel en réponse aux excuses sincères formulées en 2008 par le Premier ministre aux anciens élèves des pensionnats indiens.


Blood Tribe honours Prime Minister Harper with Kainai Chieftainship

Published: July  11, 2011 - Added: July  12, 2011 - Publication: Calgary Herald

Link http://www.calgaryherald.com/news/canada-in-afghanistan/Blood+Tribe+honours+Prime+Minister+Harper+with+Kainai+Chieftainship/5085904/story.html

CALGARY — Stephen Harper is only the second sitting prime minister to be made an honorary chief of the Blood Tribe during a ceremony in Stand Off on Monday where he received the name Chief Speaker.

Chief Charles Weasel Head first invited Harper to visit the Blood reserve and be inducted into the Kainai Chieftainship following his 2008 official government apology to First Nations people for the many abuses of the residential school system.


PM named honorary Chief of the First Nations Blood Tribe of Alberta

Published: July  11, 2011 - Added: July  12, 2011 - Publication: PMO Press Release

Link http://pm.gc.ca/eng/media.asp?category=1&featureId=6&pageId=26&id=4197

Today Prime Minister Stephen Harper was named an honorary member of the Kainai Chieftainship by the Blood Tribe of Alberta.

The honorary Chieftainship was requested by Blood Tribe Chief Charles Weasel Head in response to the heartfelt apology in 2008 by the Prime Minister to former students of Indian Residential Schools. 

Honorary Chiefs are expected to help promote the cultural pride of the Blackfoot and Kainai and all First Nations. They are expected to maintain the headdress with the highest respect and be an available resource to First Nations.


Residential schools didn't just happen elsewhere

Published: July  06, 2011 - Added: July  11, 2011 - Publication: Thompson Citizen

Link http://www.thompsoncitizen.net/article/20110706/THOMPSON0302/307069994/-1/THOMPSON/residential-schools-didnt-just-happen-elsewhere

We often act like racism is something that happens with other people somewhere else. Same for Indian Residential Schools.

If you ask local politicians or businesspeople how things are around here, they'll quickly point to the City of Thompson's Aboriginal Accord signed two years ago: "It's a platform to develop our relationships for a better Thompson and for a better life for our young people," deputy mayor Charlene Lafreniere at National Aboriginal Day festivities in MacLean Park June 21. "I'm very proud as the deputy mayor of Thompson to have the aboriginal accord as our policy and that we hold ourselves accountable and bring the leadership to the table so that we can all grow together."

Fair enough. And there's no doubt in terms of advocacy and political lobbying, policy development and service delivery, groups such as Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak (MKO), Keewatin Tribal Council (KTC) and the Manitoba the Métis Federation (MMF), are well-funded and effective across a broad range of issues.

But issues of race are not far so beneath the surface.


The voices of elders

Published: July  08, 2011 - Added: July  11, 2011 - Publication: Abbotsford News

Link http://www.bclocalnews.com/fraser_valley/abbynews/community/125225789.html

In today’s world, Coqualeetza elder Ray Silver and his people of the Sto:lo nation are free to speak their native language.

It was not always that way. Growing up in the 1930s, the Halq’emeylem tongue was forbidden by the government, even punishable by imprisonment, so his fearful parents didn’t teach him.

Since practising their culture was illegal, many traditions, such as powwows or gatherings, were stopped.


Le Chef national de l’APN pleure le décès de Gordon Tootoosis

Published: July  05, 2011 - Added: July  08, 2011 - Publication: Site web de l’Assemblée des Premières Nations

Link http://www.afn.ca/index.php/fr/nouvelles-et-medias/dernieres-nouvelles/le-chef-national-de-lapn-pleure-le-deces-de-gordon-tootoosis

(Ottawa, ON) – Le Chef national de l’Assemblée des Premières Nations (APN), Shawn A-in-chut Atleo, a commenté en ces termes la nouvelle du décès de Gordon Tootoosis, acteur et militant cri de la Première Nation Poundmaker de Saskatchewan, qui nous a quittés aujourd’hui.


AFN National Chief Mourns Passing of Gordon Tootoosis

Published: July  05, 2011 - Added: July  08, 2011 - Publication: Assembly of First Nations web site

Link http://www.afn.ca/index.php/en/news-media/latest-news/afn-national-chief-mourns-passing-of-gordon-tootoosis

(Ottawa, ON) – Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief Shawn A-in-chut Atleo commented on the passing of Gordon Tootoosis, Cree actor and activist from Poundmaker First Nation in Saskatchewan who passed away today.


Algoma U to house archive

Published: July  07, 2011 - Added: July  08, 2011 - Publication: Sault Star

Link http://www.saultstar.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3204171

A national resource centre chronicling the aboriginal residential school system will be housed at Algoma University.

The Aboriginal Healing Foundation will transfer more than 6,000 items, including audio and video interviews with former residential school students, to the university and Children of Shingwauk Alumni Association beginning in September.


60s Scoop era youth victims as well

Published: July  07, 2011 - Added: July  08, 2011 - Publication: Wawatay News Online

Link http://www.wawataynews.ca/archive/all/2011/7/7/60s-scoop-era-youth-victims-well_21651

Letter to the Editor:

Prime Minister Stephen Harper made a public apology to the residential school survivors who lived there when it closed.

This apology in my opinion did not have much truth to it because residential school in my opinion did not close.

For something to close it would mean they waited for the last child affected to grow up there. This is not what happened. Residential school children and residential school policies were transferred to the Children’s Aid Society. I lived this time period and knew kids who were in residential school and were transferred to the CAS. If these children were in residential school for one day and then were transferred to the CAS and spent five years there, they are entitled to the compensation under the Truth and Reconciliation Commission for all the years including time spent under CAS care. This compensation closed the door for the survivors of residential school only.

At one time all who lived this experience in the 1960s identified ourselves as the 60s Scoop. However with the buyout under Truth and Reconciliation there is a division among us placed there by the churches involved and the government. Our CAS records that did not begin in residential school were not included in Truth and Reconciliation therefore, we must call ourselves second generation residential school, private institution Children’s Aid Society, 60s Scoop.

The transfer of policies and kids are hidden in the words of Truth and Reconciliation and ideas that every one received money. This is not true.


Equity in Aboriginal education is the only way forward

Published: July  07, 2011 - Added: July  08, 2011 - Publication: Rabble.ca

Link http://rabble.ca/news/2011/07/equity-aboriginal-education-only-way-forward


Boyce urges residential school survivors to open up

Published: July  07, 2011 - Added: July  08, 2011 - Publication: Wawatay News Online

Link http://www.wawataynews.ca/archive/all/2011/7/7/boyce-urges-residential-school-survivors-open_21652

Returning to the site where atrocities were done to him while at residential school has proved to be therapeutic for a Thunder Bay resident.

Charles Boyce, an Eabametoong band member, has returned to the Mohawk Institute Residential School in Brantford, Ont., on seven occasions. His most recent visit two years ago included his grandchildren to show them his past and the place which led him to drugs, alcohol and years on the streets.


Remembering Gordon Tootoosis

Published: July  06, 2011 - Added: July  07, 2011 - Publication: Northern Stars.ca

Link http://www.northernstars.ca/News/01107060558_tootoosis.html

Native Canadian actor Gordon Tootoosis has died. His career as an actor spanned more than 35 years, but his early life was marked by one of those dark moments in Canadian history and the treatment of our indigenous peoples. Tootoosis began life as one of 14 children born into a family of Plains Cree where he was raised in those traditions on the Poundmaker Reserve in Saskatchewan. But he was a victim of the infamous Catholic Residential Schools and was taken from his home. Harshly treated and forbidden to speak his own language, the young Tootoosis was often in trouble at school partly because his father, John Tootoosis, was an activist for aboriginal rights.


Residential school survivors: improve mental health care

Published: July  01, 2011 - Added: July  07, 2011 - Publication: CBC.ca

Link http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/story/2011/07/01/north-trc-closing-day.html

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission's second national event is wrapping up Friday in Inuvik, N.W.T., with many delegates renewing their call for better mental health support services for everyone, not just residential school survivors, in remote northern communities.


N.L. residential school survivors seek recognition

Published: June  30, 2011 - Added: July  07, 2011 - Publication: CBC.ca

Link http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/story/2011/06/30/trc-inuvik-labrador-inuit.html

Residential school survivors from Newfoundland and Labrador say they are still seeking recognition from the federal government for what they went through.

More than a dozen former students from the province, mostly Inuit and some Métis, are among the more than 1,000 people who are attending the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's major event this week in Inuvik, N.W.T.

The Inuvik gathering, which began Tuesday and runs until Friday, is the commission's second of seven national events as it gathers statements from former residential school students, staff and others who want to share their experiences.


130 years of residential schools: By the time the last residential school closed in 1996, more than 150,000 aboriginal students attended the institutions

Published: July  04, 2011 - Added: July  07, 2011 - Publication: Northern News Services

Link http://nnsl.com/northern-news-services/stories/papers/jul4_11res.html

Three years ago Prime Minister Stephen Harper apologized to survivors of the residential school system.

"For more than a century," he said, "Indian residential schools separated more than 150,000 aboriginal children from their families and communities."

"Two primary objectives of the residential schools system were to remove and isolate children from the influence of their homes, families, traditions and cultures, and to assimilate them into the dominant culture. These objectives were based on the assumption aboriginal cultures and spiritual beliefs were inferior and unequal."

For that, he said, they were sorry.

The apology followed a historic $2-billion settlement in 2005 which was divided among an estimated 86,000 survivors based on the time they spent at residential school.


Northern event witness to pain and joy

Published: July  05, 2011 - Added: July  07, 2011 - Publication: Anglican Journal.com

Link http://www.anglicanjournal.com/nc/news-update-items/article/northern-event-witness-to-pain-and-joy-9907.html

Inuvik—As Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) Commissioner Marie Wilson put it, former Indian residential schools students who gathered here on June 27 to July 1 experienced both pain and joy.

There was pain as some recalled bitter experiences at government-funded schools run by mainline churches, which originally were meant to assimilate native children. There was joy as former classmates—some who hadn’t seen each other in 30 to 40 years—recalled moments when they had each other’s backs.

More than 1,000 former students, members of their families, representatives of churches and government agencies attended the Northern National Event of the TRC. The TRC, which is part of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement involving churches, government and survivors,  is mandated to gather the testimonies of former students and to educate Canadians about the legacy of the residential schools.


Residential school archive moves to Algoma University

Published: July  06, 2011 - Added: July  07, 2011 - Publication: SooToday.com

Link http://www.sootoday.com

The Aboriginal Healing Foundation board of directors has announced that the Children of Shingwauk Alumni Association and Algoma University will become the beneficiaries of the Gail Guthrie Valaskakis Memorial Resource Centre.

This resource centre, which commemorates Dr. Gail Guthrie Valaskakis (the AHF's original director of research who passed away in 2007), contains over 6,000 items, among them video and audio interviews of residential school survivors, research materials, and AHF project reports.


Survivors can help ensure a better future

Published: July  04, 2011 - Added: July  07, 2011 - Publication: Anglican Journal.com

Link http://www.anglicanjournal.com/nc/news-update-items/article/survivors-can-help-ensure-a-better-future-9905.html

Inuvik—Justice Murray Sinclair on July 1 challenged Indian residential school survivors to come to terms with the past, move beyond their hurts and think about what kind of future they would like to bequeath to their children and grandchildren.

A concrete way to ensure a better future, for this aboriginal generation and those to come, is for survivors to give them back the culture and language that were lost during the forced assimilation of native children in Canada, said Sinclair, chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC).

Sinclair spoke at the closing ceremonies of the National Northern Event of the TRC held here June 27 to July 1. More than 1,000 former students, their families, representatives of government, churches and the public arrived by land, sea and air to share their experiences at the event held in this town north of the Arctic Circle.


Residential school survivors in North gather to heal

Published: June  30, 2011 - Added: July  04, 2011 - Publication: Globe and Mail

Link http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/residential-school-survivors-in-north-gather-to-heal/article2083020/

Ms. Kagak is back in Inuvik, this time as one of about 1,000 residential school survivors attending the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s northern national event this week. The four-day gathering, which ends on Friday, is the second of seven such events set to take place across Canada over five years; the first was in Winnipeg a year ago.


Anglican and Roman Catholic church leaders offer apologies

Published: June  30, 2011 - Added: July  04, 2011 - Publication: The Anglican Journal

Link http://www.anglicanjournal.com/nc/news-update-items/article/anglican-and-roman-catholic-church-leaders-offer-apologies-9898.html

Three Anglican bishops and two Roman Catholic bishops offered expressions of regret, then embraced and presented each other with gifts of reconciliation.

This symbolic gesture, made here Jun. 29 at the national northern event of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) of Canada, follows a long history of division between the churches.


Survivors speak of abuse and forgiveness at national TRC event

Published: June  30, 2011 - Added: July  04, 2011 - Publication: HQYellowknife.com

Link http://hqyellowknife.com/news/local/news/Local/11/06/30/Survivors-speak-of-abuse-and-forgiveness-at-national-TRC-event/

It's not just church and government officials acknowledging what happened during 130 years of residential schools.

Participants at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission national event are hearing all kinds of stories this week in Inuvik.

By the end of the national and community events, Sinclair expects the commission will have heard some 600 statements from Northern residents.


Truth and Reconciliation Commission in Inuvik, NWT

Published: June  30, 2011 - Added: July  04, 2011 - Publication: Indian Country

Link http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2011/06/truth-and-reconciliation-commission-in-inuvik-nwt/

This week marks the second of seven National Events being held by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), which was formed in 2008 to gather testimony and help the country make reparations to its aboriginals and promote healing.


A courageous journey for Northern survivors

Published: June  30, 2011 - Added: July  04, 2011 - Publication: Northern News Services

Link http://nnsl.com/northern-news-services/stories/papers/jun30_11trc.html

Survivors of residential schools descended on Inuvik this week to continue a courageous journey of reconciliation over the legacy of assimilation started by the Canadian federal government 130 years ago.

Along with the joy of reuniting with old friends and sadness for the horror, pain and suffering from attending residential school, participants of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's northern event shared stories of what happened at the schools and the impact since.


Residential School Survivors Share Their Stories

Published: July  01, 2011 - Added: July  04, 2011 - Publication: FrenchTribune.com

Link http://frenchtribune.com/teneur/116013-residential-school-survivors-share-their-stories

Residential school survivors from across Canada have gathered this week to take part in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s northern national event.

The four day gathering, which ends on Friday, has welcomed about 1,000 residential school survivors to Inuvik, including Inuit, First Nations, and Métis participants.


TRC WRAPS UP NORTHERN NATIONAL EVENT IN INUVIK, NWT

Published: July  01, 2011 - Added: July  04, 2011 - Publication: Canadian News Wire (CNW)

Link http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive/July2011/01/c2874.html

Commissioners of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC), together with Residential School survivors, government and church leaders, Canadians and international witnesses gathered in Inuvik, NWT this week for the second TRC National Event.


Residential school survivors: improve mental health care

Published: July  01, 2011 - Added: July  04, 2011 - Publication: CBC News

Link http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/story/2011/07/01/north-trc-closing-day.html

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission's second national event is wrapping up Friday in Inuvik, N.W.T., with many delegates renewing their call for better mental health support services for everyone, not just residential school survivors, in remote northern communities.