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In the News - Archives: 2011-08


Below is a list of articles, with summary, about Indian residentials schools, the IAP and other related news.

Please follow the link to the original story for the complete article.

This information may not be available in your language of choice as it comes from third party sources.

Articles

LLRIB to host cultural camp

Published: August  31, 2011 - Added: August  31, 2011 - Publication: The La Ronge Northerner

Link http://www.townoflaronge.ca/TheNortherner/Story.php?id=866

The Lac La Ronge Indian Band (LLRIB) plans to host a culture camp at Bell’s Point Beach on Wednesday, Aug. 31 and Thursday, Sept. 1.

The first day of the event is “geared around residential schools and the second day is more toward healing.”


Giving a voice to the homeless: Website lets people speak their minds

Published: August  31, 2011 - Added: August  31, 2011 - Publication: Ottawa Citizen

Link http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/Giving+voice+homeless/5331158/story.html

Mark Horvath has been homeless in Los Angeles, parked on the sidewalk along Hollywood Boulevard with a two-metre iguana named Dog, a pairing so weird tourists paid a buck for a photo.

Horvath once had a six-figure job in television, distributing the likes of Wheel of Fortune and Jeopardy. Twenty years of booze, drugs and bad decisions landed him on the street in the 1990s. He bounced back, found sobriety, re-established himself with a house and job. Then the economy went sour and he lost that too.

Back on the street, he felt driven to use free tools - the Internet and Twitter - plus his TV skills, to tell the story of L.A.'s homeless on his video-blog.

This summer, he embarked on a cross-Canada tour organized by the Calgary Homelessness Foundation. It began in Victoria on July 4 and ends in St. John's, N.L., on Sept. 12. GMC donated a vehicle, Petro-Canada the gas, Delta the hotel rooms.

Horvath has been struck by the terrible tales he heard from Canada's aboriginal communities, particularly the generational effect of residential schools. In Fort McMurray, Alta., he heard from Cameron, an addicted man who told the story of a homeless woman accidentally carried away when a Dumpster was emptied into the garbage, of a shelterbound grandma trying to go back to college, of a single mother living in a van with two kids.


PARTAGEZ VOTRE VÉRITÉ : CVR ANNONCE LES AUDIENCES DE L’ATLANTIQUE

Published: August  29, 2011 - Added: August  30, 2011 - Publication: Communiqué de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada

Link http://www.trc.ca/websites/trcinstitution/File/pdfs/8212866_001_FR_NB_Fredericton_Hearing_2011_08_23.pdf

Le lundi 29 août 2011

En préparation de l’événement national de l’Atlantique, à Halifax, du 26 au 29 octobre, la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada (CVR) tiendra la première de six audiences dans l’Atlantique à la résidence du Lieutenant-gouverneur du Nouveau-Brunswick à Frédéricton, le jeudi 8 septembre 2011.

Les audiences de l’Atlantique visent, d’une part, à renseigner la population sur le travail de la Commission et sur le processus de collecte de déclarations, d’autre part, à fournir aux survivants le temps voulu pour réfléchir et de partager leur expérience, avant le troisième événement national de la CVR.


SHARE YOUR TRUTH: TRC ANNOUNCES ATLANTIC HEARINGS

Published: August  29, 2011 - Added: August  30, 2011 - Publication: Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada press release

Link http://www.trc.ca/websites/trcinstitution/File/pdfs/NB_Fredericton%20Hearing_2011-08-23.pdf

Monday August 29, 2011

In preparation for the Atlantic National Event from October 26-29 in Halifax, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) will host its first of six Atlantic Hearings at Government House in Fredericton on Thursday September 8, 2011.

The purpose of the Atlantic Hearings are to inform the public about the Commission’s work and statement gathering process, and provide survivors with time to reflect and share their experiences in lead up to the TRC’s third National Event.


Sex offender jailed -- 30 years later

Published: August  30, 2011 - Added: August  30, 2011 - Publication: Winnipeg Free Press

Link http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/sex-offender-jailed----30-years-later-128658843.html

THE sins of his past have finally caught up to a Manitoba sex offender.

The 57-year-old man was sentenced to 30 months in prison Monday after he admitted to repeatedly abusing a young family member between 1979 and 1982. The victim -- who was 11 when he was first attacked -- didn't come forward to police until recently.

Defence lawyer John Corona told court the man was also sexually abused as a child while in Manitoba's residential school system. His attackers included a nun and several older boys.

Umpherville said she sympathized with the accused's tragic background and medical difficulties but couldn't overlook the disturbing facts of his crimes. The man admits he raped the young victim on more than a dozen occasions, mostly while intoxicated by alcohol and hairspray.


Walking with the ancestors along the Spirit Trail

Published: August  27, 2011 - Added: August  29, 2011 - Publication: Vancouver Sun

Link http://www.vancouversun.com/sports/Walking+with+ancestors+along+Spirit+Trail/5317032/story.html

For generations, Sheryl Fisher's ancestors have lived along the north shore of what's now called Vancouver's Inner Harbour.

Now, of course, much of the land and shoreline where they fished, hunted and collected berries is covered with houses, shopping malls, streets, roads, marinas and parks that comprise the cities and regional districts of North and West Vancouver.

But soon, it will be possible to walk along the water from Deep Cove to Horseshoe Bay on the Spirit Trail, which is one of the surprising legacies of the 2010 Winter Olympics since it's not a sporting facility and it isn't seasonal.

Despite their proximity to schools, the government still forced Squamish children into residential schools in North Vancouver.

For 10 years, Fisher's mother, Audrey Rivers, went to the one at 5th Avenue and Forbes Street and could only go home for the summers.

"I think it was harder to see it and not be able to go home than to be grabbed and sent to Sechelt or Mission," says Fisher. "But my mother never gave up her language or her culture. So before I could walk or talk, she was teaching me the songs and the language. ... It's been a great strength to me."


Recovering what was lost: national video launched during celebrations at former residential school - Welcoming Aboriginal fathers back in the circle of care

Published: August  24, 2011 - Added: August  29, 2011 - Publication: National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health web site

Link http://www.nccah.ca/260/Reclaiming_what_was_lost__video_launched_at_former_residential_school.nccah


An Inspiration Named Chubby

Published: August  26, 2011 - Added: August  26, 2011 - Publication: The Tyee.ca

Link http://thetyee.ca/Life/2011/08/26/Residential-School-Healing/


Documentary on residential schools shoots in Portage

Published: August  25, 2011 - Added: August  26, 2011 - Publication: Portage la Prairie News

Link http://www.portagedailygraphic.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3273609


Consultations come to a close for residential school victims

Published: August  25, 2011 - Added: August  26, 2011 - Publication: Lloydminister Meridian Booster

Link http://www.meridianbooster.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3273149


Compensation financière pour les anciens élèves des pensionnats autochtones

Published: August  25, 2011 - Added: August  26, 2011 - Publication: Radio-Canada.ca (Saskatchewan)

Link http://www.radio-canada.ca/regions/saskatchewan/2011/08/25/005-pensionnat-indien-compensation-financiere.shtml

Les anciens résidents des pensionnats indiens ont jusqu'au 19 septembre prochain pour demander une compensation financière dans le cadre du programme de Paiement d'expérience commune (PEC) du gouvernement fédéral.

Quatre membres du programme de soutien en santé pour la Résolution des pensionnats indiens se sont rendus à Regina, jeudi, afin d'aider les Autochtones concernés à remplir leur formulaire.


Deadline near for CEP

Published: August  26, 2011 - Added: August  26, 2011 - Publication: Regina Leader-Post

Link http://www.leaderpost.com/life/Deadline+near/5309592/story.html


Support the Walkers for Truth and Reconciliation

Published: August  22, 2011 - Added: August  25, 2011 - Publication: Turtle Island Native Network’s Forums

Link http://www.turtleisland.org/discussion/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=9016

The Aboriginal Nurses Association of Canada (A.N.A.C.), is pleased to add their voice, encouragement and support for the Walkers for Truth and Reconciliation who have travelled far from their communities and who are expected to arrive in the Ottawa on August 22, 2011.

This walk, which began in Cochrane Ontario on July 29, 2011, is designed to raise public awareness with Canadians on how residential school issues have impacted residential school survivors, their children and grandchildren. As they continue on their journey, the walkers are receiving support and greetings from many survivors and others. People are giving flags, ribbons, tobacco and other special mementos to carry on for their journey to Halifax, Nova Scotia for the Truth and Reconciliation Commission National Event being held October 26-29, 2011.

 


Online resources aid truth and reconciliation process

Published: August  23, 2011 - Added: August  25, 2011 - Publication: ChristianWeek.org

Link http://www.christianweek.org/stories.php?id=1648

TORONTO, ON - The Anglican Church of Canada is launching new online resources on the residential schools program, in support of the broader work of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC).

Henriette Thompson, General Synod's facilitator of the TRC national events, says the goal is to "provide in depth, reliable and accurate information about the Anglican Church of Canada's involvement in the residential schools situation, and also to be able to set that in the light of colonialism and that period of Canada's history."


After Residential School, My Path to Healing: Theodore Fontaine spent 12 years in residential school. And the rest of his life learning how to talk about it. A memoir, part one.

Published: August  25, 2011 - Added: August  25, 2011 - Publication: TheTyee.ca

Link http://thetyee.ca/Life/2011/08/25/Residential-School-Memoir/


Commission Marks the Passing of Jack Layton

Published: August  22, 2011 - Added: August  24, 2011 - Publication: Truth and Reconciliation Commission Web Site

Link http://www.trc.ca/websites/trcinstitution/index.php?p=3

The Commissioners extend their condolences to the family and friends of the Honourable Jack Layton, Leader of the Opposition who passed away this morning. Mr. Layton was instrumental in bringing about the Statement of Apology issued by the Government of Canada to residential school survivors in June 2008.


Updated! Where Are The Walkers for Truth and Reconciliation?

Published: August  23, 2011 - Added: August  24, 2011 - Publication: Truth and Reconciliation Commission Web Site

Link http://www.trc.ca/websites/trcinstitution/index.php?p=3

Yesterday, Patrick Etherington Sr. and his group of Walkers arrived at the Human Rights Monument on Elgin Street. Patrick and the members of his group spoke about their Walk for Truth and Reconciliation, the legacy of Residential School and its significance for all Canadians.


Prince Rupert hosts National Aboriginal Spiritual Gathering

Published: August  24, 2011 - Added: August  24, 2011 - Publication: The Northern View.com

Link http://www.bclocalnews.com/bc_north/thenorthernview/news/128280138.html

Over the weekend at the Jim Ciccone Civic Centre over 100 representatives from Aboriginal communities across Canada met with the leadership of the United Church of Canada - the country’s largest protestant denomination - for the National Aboriginal Spiritual Gathering, a meeting that happens every three years to provide the church with direction on how it deals with issues that affect the Aboriginal members of its congregation.

The gatherings began after the church apologized for its role in the residential school system in 1998. Since then, the United Church of Canada says it’s committed to “a journey of repentance” for the harm caused by the schools to Aboriginal children and their families. Previously the church had apologized in 1986, but made no direct reference to residential schools.


Lawsuit targets '60s scoop' of aboriginal children

Published: August  23, 2011 - Added: August  24, 2011 - Publication: Saskatoon Star-Phoenix (Postmedia News)

Link http://www.thestarphoenix.com/life/Lawsuit+targets+scoop+aboriginal+children/5296485/story.html


Theatre Review: Salmon Row tells the history of Cannery Row

Published: August  23, 2011 - Added: August  23, 2011 - Publication: Vancouver Province

Link http://www.theprovince.com/Mortal+Coil+Performance+Society+turns+Cannery+into+Salmon/5289619/story.html


Remembering Jack Layton: 1950-2011

Published: August  22, 2011 - Added: August  23, 2011 - Publication: waynekspear.com

Link http://waynekspear.com/2011/08/22/remembering-jack-layton-1950-2011/


How to Look at Canada’s Residential School Archives

Published: August  18, 2011 - Added: August  23, 2011 - Publication: waynekspear.com

Link http://waynekspear.com/2011/08/18/how-to-look-at-canadas-residential-school-archives/


UCR Scholar to Study Sami Filmmaking: Michelle H. Raheja receives a Fulbright fellowship to study visual culture of one of the largest indigenous groups in Europe.

Published: August  15, 2011 - Added: August  22, 2011 - Publication: University of California, Riverside Press Release

Link http://newsroom.ucr.edu/2703


Charlie Hunter’s finally home with his family

Published: August  19, 2011 - Added: August  22, 2011 - Publication: Toronto Star

Link http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/article/1042121--charlie-hunter-s-finally-home-with-his-family?bn=1

 Charlie Hunter was finally buried beneath the tundra of his home village of Peawanuck, population 250, in the remote Canadian Shield as family members sang Roman Catholic hymns, traditional aboriginal songs and Amazing Grace in Cree.

For 37 years, Charlie’s body lay 515 kilometres away, under a white cross in Moosoonee. There are no roads between Peawanuck and Moosonee.

The 13-year-old drowned on Oct. 22, 1974 while attending St. Anne’s residential school in Fort Albany as he tried to rescue a partially sighted student who had fallen through the ice. He was buried in Moosonee before his family was consulted.


Olympic role model urges native youth to pursue future dreams

Published: August  20, 2011 - Added: August  22, 2011 - Publication: Lake of the Woods Enterprise

Link http://www.lotwenterprise.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3265501


Film focuses on aboriginal dads

Published: August  22, 2011 - Added: August  22, 2011 - Publication: Edmonton Journal

Link http://www.edmontonjournal.com/entertainment/movie-guide/Film+focuses+aboriginal+dads/5287618/story.html

Blue Quills First Nations College, a former residential school, is celebrating its 40th anniversary by educating fathers in aboriginal communities about parenting.

At an alumni event Monday, the school is screening a new documentary about strengthening relationships between aboriginal fathers and their children. The film, With Dad: Strengthening the Circle of Care, explores postresidential school society and the lasting effects the system had on family structure.


Essay opens doors to future: Student receives award, scholarship

Published: August  21, 2011 - Added: August  22, 2011 - Publication: Winnipeg Free Press

Link http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/essay-opens-doors-to-future-128143613.html

 A school essay about the fallout of residential schools made jaws drop when Grade 12 student Taren Orchard wrote about growing up in a series of foster homes.

The page-turner describing his struggles and anxiety bouncing in and out of foster homes in northwestern Ontario earned him a City of Winnipeg Youth Role Model Award.

The gifted young writer, however, wasn't planning to attend university this fall. All that's changed since word got out about the young man graduating from Children of the Earth High School.

He now has a four-year scholarship to attend the University of Winnipeg.


Message by Justice Murray Sinclair on the occasion of the removal of the remains of Charlie Hunter to his home community.

Published: August  18, 2011 - Added: August  19, 2011 - Publication: Truth and Reconciliation Commission Web Site

Link http://www.trc.ca/websites/trcinstitution/index.php?p=415

The TRC is pleased to share this day when Charlie Hunter returns home. While there is an aura of celebration to this day, we also recognize that this is a day founded on the tragedy of a lost child and of parents left without the right to grieve properly. For that reason we express our condolences and best wishes to Charlie's parents and brothers and children.


First Nations man walks to raise awareness of residential schools

Published: August  18, 2011 - Added: August  19, 2011 - Publication: Cochrane Times-Post

Link http://www.cochranetimespost.ca/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3263459

Residential school survivor Patrick Etherington seeks to spread not only awareness about residential schools, but also to bring healing to those affected by them.

Mr. Etherington, who is from the Nishnawbe Aski Nation (NAN) James Bay Treaty Nine Territory, had survived the experience he had at the Albany Mission Indian Residential School in Fort Albany. He reminisced on the horrible acts of cruelty he witnessed in the school, and said he has seen the affects residential schools have on First Nations families.

Annual national awareness walks have been organized in the past. Mr. Etherington is preparing for this year's walk from Cochrane's Ininew Friendship Centre to Halifax, Nova Scotia.


Ken Bear Chief Reaches Out to Boarding-School Survivors

Published: August  19, 2011 - Added: August  19, 2011 - Publication: Indian Country Today Media Network.com

Link http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2011/08/ken-bear-chief-reaches-out-to-boarding-school-survivors/

Ken Bear Chief’s voice shakes with fury as he recounts testimony he’s taken as Tamaki Law Firm’s liaison to Native Americans who’ve sued the Catholic Church for childhood sexual abuse. Five hundred of the firm’s Native plaintiffs recently participated in a historic $166-million-dollar payment from the Jesuit order. In cooperation with the law firms of Gregory Yates and Manly and Stewart, Tamaki is now handling dozens more cases in South Dakota and elsewhere.


Aboriginals will suffer: experts - Bar association fears effects of minimum sentencing

Published: August  19, 2011 - Added: August  19, 2011 - Publication: Winnipeg Free Press

Link http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/breakingnews/aboriginals-will-suffer-experts-128059833.html

OTTAWA -- Legal experts fear the Harper government's push for mandatory minimum sentences will unfairly target aboriginals.

"Aboriginal people are being locked up like it's going out of style," said Manitoba lawyer Brad Regehr, the outgoing chairman of the Canadian Bar Association's national aboriginal law section.

"This is simply going to impact them further. It's not rocket science."

The Canadian Bar Association wants the federal government to ensure upcoming legislation on mandatory minimum sentences will not override a 1999 Supreme Court decision directing judges to consider sentencing alternatives for aboriginals. The Gladue decision said judges should take into account the poor social and economic conditions facing aboriginals as well as the devastating effects of residential schools on aboriginal families.


Dropout chiefs imperil a generation of kids

Published: August  17, 2011 - Added: August  17, 2011 - Publication: Globe and Mail

Link http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/john-ibbitson/dropout-chiefs-imperil-a-generation-of-kids/article2131931/

Indian leaders in three key provinces appear determined to wreck the best chance in a generation to improve the miserable state of on-reserve schools.

Chiefs representing about 230 first nations in Ontario, Quebec and Saskatchewan have decided to boycott a three-person panel charged with finding fixes for the broken first nations education system. Native children will pay the price for this stiff-necked opposition, based on ancient animosities and petty political ambition. Right now, the federal government sends education grants to reserves, with chiefs using the money as they see fit. Some build and staff schools; some don't. Only 40 per cent of on-reserve students graduate from high school, half the rate of the general population.

At root is the legacy of the residential schools, which abused generations of Indians in an effort to force their assimilation. That dismantled and discredited system left an ingrained suspicion among many native leaders of education itself and of anything associated with the federal government.


25 Years Later: The United Church of Canada’s Apology to Aboriginal Peoples

Published: August  16, 2011 - Added: August  17, 2011 - Publication: Indian Country Today Media Network.com

Link http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2011/08/25-years-later-the-united-church-of-canadas-apology-to-aboriginal-peoples/

Much has been made of the historic 2008 apology from Prime Minister Stephen Harper to aboriginal peoples about the residential schools system. But long before that there were Alberta Billy and Canada’s United Church.

Today marks the 25th anniversary of the apology to aboriginal peoples from the United Church of Canada, the first denomination to do so. In 1981, Billy, a member of the Laichwiltach We Wai kai Nation in British Columbia, stood before the leaders of one of Canada’s largest churches and asked for something that few had even discussed before.


The Politics and Power in Caregiving for Identity: Insights for Indian Residential School Truth and Reconciliation

Published: August  15, 2011 - Added: August  17, 2011 - Publication: Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society (Volume 18, Number 2 - Summer 2011)

Link http://sp.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2011/08/11/sp.jxr015.abstract?ct=ct

Abstract (Full article available by subscription only)

The authors examine the politics of caregiving for identity to enrich scholarship about power. They report on a qualitative study with Aboriginal mothers who parent in the wake of the Canadian Indian residential schools (IRS). Just as this system disrupted familial caregiving to assimilate Aboriginal Peoples, data show some mothers now strive to organize their caregiving in ways that serve decolonization and community empowerment. Building on their expertise, the authors argue that counter-colonial family policy investments to support such caregiving should factor in any just compensation for the IRS system if its population, and not just individual, costs are to be redressed.


Le voyage se poursuit - Patrick Etherington, père et les marcheurs pour la vérité et réconciliation du Canada (CVR)

Published: August  15, 2011 - Added: August  17, 2011 - Publication: Le site web de la CVR

Link http://www.trc.ca/websites/trcinstitution/index.php?p=15

Patrick Etherington, père et un groupe d’amis ont entrepris une marche de Cochrane (Ontario)  jusqu’à Halifax (Nouvelle-Écosse) à l’occasion de l'événement national de l'Atlantique, qui se déroulera du 26 au 29 octobre 2011. À leur arrivée à Halifax, les marcheurs auront parcouru près de 2 200 kilomètres.


The Journey Continues- Patrick Etherington Sr. and the Truth and Reconciliation Walkers

Published: August  11, 2011 - Added: August  17, 2011 - Publication: TRC Web Site

Link http://www.trc.ca/websites/trcinstitution/index.php?p=3

Patrick Etherington Sr. and some friends are walking from Cochrane, Ontario to Halifax, Nova Scotia for the Atlantic National Event happening October 26 to 29, 2011. By the time they reach Halifax, they will have walked approximately 2,200 kilometres.


Les audiences de l’Atlantique de la CVR commencent le 8 septembre

Published: August  16, 2011 - Added: August  17, 2011 - Publication: Le site web de la CVR

Link http://www.trc.ca/websites/trcinstitution/index.php?p=15

En préparation de l’événement national de l’Atlantique (ÉNA), à Halifax (26-29 octobre), la CVR tiendra des audiences dans toute la région de l’Atlantique, afin de donner aux survivants des pensionnats indiens l’occasion de partager leur vérité.

8 septembre : Frédéricton (N.-B.)

20 septembre : Goose Bay (T.-N.-L.)

22 septembre : Hopedale (T.-N.-L.) (Nunatsiavut)

4 octobre : Charlottetown (I.-P.-E.)

12 octobre : Shubenacadie/Indian Brook (N.-É.)

14 octobre : Eskasoni (N.-É.)


TRC Atlantic Hearings Begin September 8

Published: August  12, 2011 - Added: August  17, 2011 - Publication: TRC Web Site

Link http://www.trc.ca/websites/trcinstitution/index.php?p=3

In preparation for the Atlantic National Event (ANE) in Halifax (October 26-29) the TRC will hold hearings across the Atlantic region to give Residential School Survivors the opportunity to Share their Truth:

September 8- Fredericton, NB

September 20-21: Goose Bay, NL

September 22-23: Hopedale, NL (Nunatsiavut)

October 4: Charlottetown, PEI

October 12-13: Shubenacadie/Indian Brook, NS

October 14: Eskasoni, NS


Last chance for CEP residential school applications: About 2,450 Nunavut Inuit have applied so far

Published: August  15, 2011 - Added: August  17, 2011 - Publication: Nunatsiaq OnLine

Link http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674last_chance_for_cep_res-school_applications/

Former students of aboriginal residential schools have one last chance to apply for compensation under the Common Experience Payment program.

The deadline for receipt of CEP applications falls on Sept. 19.

To date, 4,364 Inuit have applied and received a CEP cheque, according to the federal government’s latest numbers.

Of those claimants, 2,451 come from Nunavut.


Last chance for CEP residential school applications: About 2,450 Nunavut Inuit have applied so far

Published: August  15, 2011 - Added: August  15, 2011 - Publication: Nunatsiaq OnLine

Link http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674last_chance_for_cep_res-school_applications/

Former students of aboriginal residential schools have one last chance to apply for compensation under the Common Experience Payment program.

The deadline for receipt of CEP applications falls on Sept. 19.

To date, 4,364 Inuit have applied and received a CEP cheque, according to the federal government’s latest numbers.

Of those claimants, 2,451 come from Nunavut.


Empowering victims

Published: August  11, 2011 - Added: August  12, 2011 - Publication: Lloydminister Meridian Booster

Link http://www.meridianbooster.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3254502

 The scars of a 'dreadful chapter in Canadian history,' according to Prime Minister Stephen Harper, are still fresh for those who went to residential schools.

For many the wounds are still real and the pain is still prevalent and many have the chance to file a claim against the federal government under the Common Experience Payment.

For the next two weeks, the Native Friendship Centre in Lloydminster is bringing in Honour Walk Ltd. to assist people with making a claim.


Nunavut claimants lag behind on IAP applications: Average payment of $100,000 to $150,000 for serious sexual, physical abuse at residential school

Published: August  11, 2011 - Added: August  12, 2011 - Publication: Nunatsiaq OnLine

Link http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/1108778_nunavut_claimants_lag_behind_on_iap_applications/

Fewer former residential school students from Nunavut who suffered physical and sexual abuse as children have applied to a federal compensation program than have other former residential school students.

That federal program, called the Independent Assessment Process, is one element of the Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement, which Canadian courts approved in 2007.

But, unlike the Common Experience Payment, or CEP, which is available to anyone who attended an aboriginal residential school, you have to apply separately for the Independent Assessment Process, or IAP.


South Africa trip gives students hope

Published: August  10, 2011 - Added: August  11, 2011 - Publication: The Sou’Wester (Winnipeg Free Press)

Link http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/our-communities/souwester/South-Africa-trip-gives-students-hope-127332108.html

A police officer’s desire for social justice prompted a recent trip to South Africa to learn about racial segregation and living in a post-apartheid world.

Staff Sgt. Bob Chrismas, 49, of the Winnipeg Police Service, was among 13 graduate and undergraduate students from Winnipeg who recently visited the African nation learn to learn about a society living in the shadow of apartheid and how reconciliation is a crucial part of the healing process.

The University of Winnipeg Global College initiated the course, which included students from the University of Manitoba. The contingent was joined by six South African students, as the program is offered in partnership with the Cornerstone Institute in Cape Town.

"One of the special things about the trip was how we would all sit in sharing circles and talk about the effects of apartheid in South Africa and residential schools in Canada," said student Colin Bourrier, who was also on the trip.


The Late Show: Episode 7 - Father Jean Pochat – Broadcast on August 9 (7:30 pm) and August 12 (9:30 am)

Published: August  07, 2011 - Added: August  10, 2011 - Publication: CBC.ca

Link http://www.cbc.ca/thelateshow/season-three/2011/08/07/episode-7---father-jean-pochat---august-9-12/

Father Jean Pochat was seen by many as a rebel. An open-minded, trustworthy priest, he was not afraid to challenge the hierarchy of the church. Born in France, he spent nearly 60 years with his feet firmly planted on the permafrost in the Northwest Territories. He was head of the residential school - Grandin College - and charged with producing nuns and priests, instead he encouraged his graduates to become aboriginal leaders and activists. Father Pochat also helped survivors of abuse from other residential schools stand up for their rights. Father Pochat died in 2010 at home, in Behchoko, NWT with his family, the Tlicho.


Residential students face payment deadline

Published: August  09, 2011 - Added: August  10, 2011 - Publication: CBC.ca

Link http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/story/2011/08/08/north-residential-payment-deadline.html

The deadline to apply for the Residential School Common Experience payment is coming up quickly, and former students who fail to make an application by Sept. 19 will miss out.

The payment is just one element in the residential school settlement that was reached between the federal government, the churches and aboriginal groups.


“Promising practices” identified to address pressing issues in Aboriginal maternal and child health: The Health Council of Canada partners with Aboriginal communities to highlight what’s working

Published: August  09, 2011 - Added: August  10, 2011 - Publication: Health Council of Canada web site

Link http://www.healthcouncilcanada.ca/docs/rpts/2011/abhealth/Ab%20Health%20-%20Traditional%20Release_FINAL_%20ENG.pdf

TORONTO - August 9, 2011 – Today, the Health Council of Canada released Understanding and Improving Aboriginal Maternal and Child Health in Canada, a commentary highlighting the continuing health inequities between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Canadians as well as promising practices for change.

Key comments highlighting critical issues affecting Aboriginal maternal and child health in various regions include:

Legacy social issues: Critical issues that create roadblocks for improved maternal and child health include poverty, colonialism, racism and the traumatic legacy of residential chools.


Filmmaker Chronicles Walter Littlemoon’s Emergence from ‘The Thick Dark Fog’

Published: August  07, 2011 - Added: August  08, 2011 - Publication: Indian Country Today Media Network.com

Link http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2011/08/filmmaker-chronicles-walter-littlemoons-emergence-from-the-thick-dark-fog/


Unfair Comparison (Letter to the Editor)

Published: August  08, 2011 - Added: August  08, 2011 - Publication: Winnipeg Sun

Link http://www.winnipegsun.com/2011/08/05/letters-aug-8

Re: 'Rec centre to open in fall,' Aug. 4.

    The project springing up in the Main Street area, the Youth for Christ complex, is not only a much-needed facility for youth, but represents hope for many of the young people in the city.

    It does not need criticism before it even starts, but support from our governing structure. Comparing it to a residential school by a director of the Southern Chiefs Organization is certainly unfair and inaccurate. I attended a residential school and I fail to see the resemblance.

    Instead of this criticism, these people should be standing up and offering alternatives and other opportunities. A facility that would develop sport, school of dance, music, and life skills will certainly give these young people a chance to take part in society. Let's give this project a chance; the people behind it certainly have vision and a hope for youth.

    CARL MCCORRISTER

Agreed. A youth centre can only help that area of town.


James Bartleman pens potential winner with aboriginal tragedy: Novel on Scotiabank Giller Prize radar. John Bartleman of Perth has a new novel destined for school boards

Published: August  07, 2011 - Added: August  08, 2011 - Publication: Your Ottawa Region.com

Link http://www.yourottawaregion.com/news/article/1053662--james-bartleman-pens-potential-winner-with-aboriginal-tragedy

For the past five years, James Bartleman has been penning novels. He didn't begin to write until well into his 60s and now, five published works later, his latest has been submitted by his publisher for consideration of the Scotiabank Giller Prize.

The Giller Prize awards $50,000 annually to the author of the best Canadian novel or short story collection.

This fiction novel, As Long as the River Flows, published by Knopf Canada, is one that is close to Bartleman's heart.

The story follows, Martha - who is a composite of three different women - from the Cat Lake First Nation in Northern Ontario. She is taken from her family at the age of six and flown far away to residential school. She doesn't speak English, and is punished for speaking her native language. Most terrifying and bewildering, she is sexually abused by the school's priest.


Walkers begin trek to TRC event in Halifax

Published: August  04, 2011 - Added: August  05, 2011 - Publication: Wawatay News

Link http://www.wawataynews.ca/archive/all/2011/8/4/walkers-begin-trek-trc-event-halifax_21727

Residential school memories flooded back for Patrick Etherington Sr. at the beginning of his latest walk.

Ethering and a group of youth are walking 2,200 kilometres to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) of Canada national event in Halifax, N.S. Oct. 26-29.


Statement-gathering still available for residential school survivors: One month after Truth and Reconciliation, stories can still be told

Published: August  04, 2011 - Added: August  05, 2011 - Publication: Northern News Services

Link http://nnsl.com/northern-news-services/stories/papers/aug4_11trc.html

In a small office with two windows, Sheila Mazhari sits listening to residential school survivors retelling their story.

One month after the national Truth and Reconciliation event in Inuvik, people still have the opportunity to put what happened to them on the record and make it a part of the history of residential schools.

"It's good that I'm still here," Mazhari said. "There was no way to get to everybody and there are so many stories that people have to say."

Mazhari, a TRC statement gatherer working with the Gwich'in Tribal Council, will stay in Inuvik until October to make sure everyone has a chance to speak when they are ready. She will also travel to the Gwich'in communities and possibly Tuktoyaktuk to record stories from survivors in those communities.


People, including priests and nuns, make mistakes (Letter to the Editor)

Published: August  03, 2011 - Added: August  05, 2011 - Publication: Hamilton Spectator

Link http://www.thespec.com/opinion/letters/article/572851--people-including-priests-and-nuns-make-mistakes

Re: Catholic schools in a catastrophic state (Opinion, Aug. 3)

This article was clearly written by a passionate person who cares about the current state of our society. I admire this.

I must share, though, that I believe all the blame cannot be placed on the lay people. Priests and nuns are also men and women. Men and women are capable of making mistakes, misinforming and misinterpreting. The most “catastrophic” injustice that comes to mind is the horror experienced by our native brothers and sisters in the residential school system — run by the church. These were misguided men and women, and they were also priests and nuns.


Obituary: Keeper of the wampum: William Commanda, Algonquin elder

Published: August  04, 2011 - Added: August  05, 2011 - Publication: CBC.ca

Link http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/story/2011/08/03/f-william-commanda-algonquin-elder.html

William Commanda, an Algonquin elder and aboriginal role model, died Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2011 at 97. He spent years advocating forgiveness and reconciliation with non-aboriginals, despite having lived through hard years of poverty and suffering.


Residential Schools Settlement Update for August 3, 2011:

Published: August  03, 2011 - Added: August  05, 2011 - Publication: The First Perspective

Link http://www.firstperspective.ca/releases/2809-residential-schools-settlement-update-for-august-3-2011.html

Update for August 3, 2011:

A new request form for Expedited / High Priority Hearings is now available on the IAP website


Native Children in care surpass Residential School era

Published: July  31, 2011 - Added: August  02, 2011 - Publication: CTV.ca

Link http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/Canada/20110731/native-children-care-surpass-residential-school-era-110731/

OTTAWA — John Beaucage has given the heartbreak he sees around him a name: the Millennium Scoop.

The First Nations leader was recently hired by the Ontario government to look into aboriginal child welfare and what he found -- not just in Ontario, but across the country -- was despair.

After decades of wrestling with the impact of the residential school system -- and then with the "Sixties Scoop" that placed so many aboriginal children in non-aboriginal homes -- First Nations are now facing another tragedy of lost children in the new millennium.

There are more First Nations children in care right now than at the height of the residential school system. That system was a national disgrace that prompted Prime Minister Stephen Harper to apologize for its catastrophic impact on natives.


Prisons, Residential Schools, Homelessness – We Must Never Give Up on People

Published: July  25, 2011 - Added: August  02, 2011 - Publication: You Tube video

Link http://www.youtube.com/user/invisiblepeopletv#p/u/5/saIotyGbn9M

In this 12-minute video Lydia Bardak, Executive Director of the John Howard Society of the Northwest Territories, shares her personal story.  Ms. Bardak talks about how prisons, addictions, residential schools, child protective services, and homelessness all interrelate.


Another view of monarchy

Published: August  02, 2011 - Added: August  02, 2011 - Publication: Windsor Star

Link http://www2.canada.com/windsorstar/news/editorial/story.html?id=86266e9f-50ee-4e91-9972-5af2080c3a0a

Re: Monarchy has done no harm, by James Forsyth, July 21.

   Monarchy has done harm, historically speaking. Your statement might have been true, Mr. Forsyth, if it was followed by the word "recently."

Unfortunately, the effects of colonization are still felt not only in Canada but throughout the world.

   I suggest for their next visit Kate and Will should be present during a day of Aboriginal survivors testifying at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Let them see what colonization has really done to us.


Des militantes et des militants des TUAC Canada font un bout de chemin au Rassemblement du Cercle autochtone de la FTO en portant les mocassins

Published: June  27, 2011 - Added: August  02, 2011 - Publication: Un communiqué des Travailleurs et travailleuses unis de l’alimentation et du commerce Canada

Link http://www.tuac.ca/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2444:walking-in-our-moccasins-ufcw-canada-activists-participate-in-2nd-gathering-of-the-ofl-aboriginal-circle&catid=6:directions-newsletter&Itemid=6&lang=fr


UFCW CANADA ACTIVISTS WALK IN THE MOCCASINS AT OFL ABORIGINAL GATHERING

Published: June  27, 2011 - Added: August  02, 2011 - Publication: United Food and Commercial Workers Union press release

Link http://www.ufcw.ca/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2444%3Awalking-in-our-moccasins-ufcw-canada-activists-participate-in-2nd-gathering-of-the-ofl-aboriginal-circle&catid=6%3Adirections-newsletter&Itemid=6&lang=en

UFCW Canada social justice activists recently came out in force to learn and support in "Walking in Our Moccasins", a second Aboriginal Gathering sponsored by the Ontario Federation of Labour (OFL) Aboriginal Circle in Port Elgin, Ontario.

The Residential Schools workshop dealt with the hideous history of aboriginal children in Christian residential schools where some were tortured, experimented on, sterilized, and even murdered.  One of the prime factors in establishing the Residential schools was to "civilize"  and "Christianize" aboriginal communities across Canada.  During the workshop, facilitator Grandmother Rose shared her personal experience as a survivor.


“Native Children in Care Surpass Residential School Era”

Published: August  01, 2011 - Added: August  02, 2011 - Publication: ETEC 521: Indigeneity, Technology and Education (May 2011) MET Course Weblog

Link http://blogs.ubc.ca/etec521may11/2011/07/31/native-children-in-care-surpass-residential-school-era/

This article, published yesterday on CTV.ca, titled, “Native Children in Care Surpass Residential School Era” discusses the long term effects the residential schools have had on Native communities and the Canadian Child Welfare Program. The article mentions what we have all been discussing in the online vista boards, that the residential schools have severely damaged first nations communities – not just the people who were victims of the schools.

What’s interesting is that the article states that the residential school period was 1940 -50. Which is not entirely true – the last residential school closed down in 1996 (according to wikipedia)!