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In the News - Archives: 2012-04


Below is a list of articles, with summary, about Indian residentials schools, the IAP and other related news.

Please follow the link to the original story for the complete article.

This information may not be available in your language of choice as it comes from third party sources.

Articles

Healing: A compassionate reaching out to the survivors of the Aboriginal Residential Schools

Published: Aprilá 30, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 30, 2012 - Publication: RobertMcaffee.com

Link http://www.robertmcaffee.com/aboriginal-residential-schools.html

Since their very inception in the late 1800's in Canada, children from Aboriginal homes across Canada were removed to live in facilities geared towards education and reforming their minds and lives, or so it was thought. Let me say for the record of this blog that it is clear that most of the staff of those institutions were not participants in the abuse of the children, many of the staff were simply ignorant or kept away from knowing the sad truths unfolding behind closed doors. Those who inflicted the pain and damage on those children's lives were truly monsters of the highest order. In this posting I do not wish to dwell on them as they are being dealt with one by one through both the courts and the courts of public opinion and shame. For this posting I choose to focus on the children. 

This brings me to the point of this posting. Some time ago I determined that I would do a painting that expresses my inner most feeling about this sad part of our history. My painting would address each of the elements of the story and leave out mentioning the inflictors of the pain (They have received enough attention). My painting would support the survivors and give hope for a better future. It would not simply generalize the entire group of victims but draw attention to their individuality as humans and persons of importance.


Aboriginal reconciliation: An open letter to Stephen Harper

Published: Aprilá 30, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 30, 2012 - Publication: Globe and Mail

Link http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/opinions/opinion/aboriginal-reconciliation-an-open-letter-to-stephen-harper/article2416077/?utm_medium=Feeds%3A%20RSS%2FAtom&utm_source=Politics&utm_content=2416077

Dear Prime Minister:

When I heard your words in the House of Commons that were deemed an apology for the debacle of Canada’s residential school system, I was heartened. At that time, it was nothing short of amazing to hear a prime minister use the word “wrong” in reference to Canada’s treatment of aboriginal people. Now, nearly four years later, I look at the astoundingly hurtful cuts to organizations whose sole purposes are the re-empowerment and well-being of aboriginal people, and I am disheartened. Hell, Mr. Harper, I am downright angry.


Writer wins journalism award for story in The Gazette

Published: Aprilá 30, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 30, 2012 - Publication: Montreal Gazette

Link http://www.montrealgazette.com/news/Writer+wins+journalism+award+story+Gazette/6536705/story.html

Freelance writer Andrew Stobo Sniderman won a big prize at the Canadian Association of Journalists' award ceremony on Saturday night.

Sniderman won in the print-feature category for his story, Residential schools: Survivors share the pain, published in The Gazette on May 7, 2011.

His report on Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission on residential schools laid bare the human tragedies of the residential school system.

The CAJ Awards were handed out Saturday evening at a gala event in Toronto. Global National anchor Dawna Friesen served that as the event’s MC.


Nunatsiavut Government to host Residential School Exhibit’s in Nain, Rigolet and HVGB

Published: Aprilá 25, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 27, 2012 - Publication: The Labradorian

Link http://www.thelabradorian.ca/News/2012-04-25/article-2963642/Nunatsiavut-Government-to-host-Residential-School-Exhibit%26rsquos-in-Nain,-Rigolet-and-HVGB/1

The Nunatsiavut Government and The Legacy of Hope Foundation will be holding a Labrador tour of “We are so far away…”:The Inuit Experience of Residential Schools.

An exhibit will be on display in Nain from April 25-27 at the Nunatsiavut Government Board, in Rigolet at the Community Hall and NG/DHSD multipurpose room from April 30-May1, and will conclude in Happy Valley-Goose Bay at the Nunatsiavut DHSD multi-purpose room on May3-4.

Presentation will also be hosted in each of the communities Junior High and senior High Schools and separate ceremonies will be held for the 8 survivors and their family members along with a community viewing.

Guest speakers who are residential school survivors will speak at events, there will be a DVD showing, viewing of an exhibit, and a sharing circle.


Offering truth and reconciliation in Peterborough May 5 and 6

Published: Aprilá 25, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 27, 2012 - Publication: MyKawartha.com

Link http://www.mykawartha.com/community/article/1342994--offering-truth-and-reconciliation-in-peterborough-may-5-and-6

 A local support groups hopes to shed some light on the long-term effects of the residential school system on Aboriginal students.

The Kawartha Truth and Reconciliation support group will hold a conference May 5 and 6 at Trent University. It is open to the community.

During the conference, members of the committee and keynote speakers will address concerns about the effects of the residential school system and colonization process on Aboriginal students, and in turn, the loss of a valuable sense of identity.


Reconciling with first nations communities will not be easy (Letter to the Editor)

Published: Aprilá 26, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 27, 2012 - Publication: Vancouver Sun

Link http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Reconciling+with+first+nations+communities+will+easy/6521684/story.html

Re: 'We carried this with us all our lives'; Aboriginals tell of rape, beatings at residential schools, April 14.

I volunteered in Victoria at the peace and reconciliation process on the fall-out of residential schools April 13-14.

It was a powerfully moving experience that caused me to consider the idea of reconciliation.

The Missing Women Inquiry goes on with no legal support for first nations testimony.

There is little government initiative to end the HIV/AIDS epidemic among first nations people.

First nations' rate of incarceration is hugely disproportionate to their population.

Harper is likely pushing through the Enbridge pipeline and tanker route despite strong opposition from the majority of first nations peoples whose land, waters, and way of life will be degraded, possibly severely.

The assault on first nations communities continues.

There can be no real reconciliation until we address what's happening right now.

Dorothy Field Victoria


Long in our past (Letter to the Editor)

Published: Aprilá 23, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 23, 2012 - Publication: Winnipeg Free Press

Link http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/opinion/letters_to_the_editor/have-your-say-148478355.html

Re: An arrogant opinion (Letters, April 14). It comes as no surprise to me that Hollow Water First Nation resident Christine Barker assumes I am arrogant simply because I have a differing opinion from her own.

Barker needs to keep in mind that the aboriginal residential school issue is long in our past. The issue has been studied and debated ad nauseam.

If aboriginal people want respect, they need to take action in their own communities and among their own people to earn it. Waiting for the rest of society to solve one's problem is simply passing the buck.

CAL PAUL

Winnipeg


Regina students honour residential school victims

Published: Aprilá 20, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 20, 2012 - Publication: Regina Leader Post

Link http://www.leaderpost.com/news/Regina+students+honour+residential+school+victims/6488080/story.html

Two hundred and sixty one small, colourful tiles lined the tables of St. Bernadette School on Thursday.

Their designs were different, but many of them shared similar themes. A number of hearts could be seen — some full, others broken. Many crosses were also displayed to mark a gravesite. Also noticeable were the messages of love.

By creating these tiles, the elementary students from Regina were honouring aboriginal children who died in residential schools.


Truth Telling: Holding out hope for healing

Published: Aprilá 19, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 20, 2012 - Publication: OakBayNews.com

Link http://www.oakbaynews.com/opinion/148167225.html

When Esquimalt Nation Chief Andy Thomas took the stage at the Truth and Reconciliation event last week, he didn’t focus on Indian residential schools.

He used his spotlight to talk about the present: about the Douglas treaties that still need to be addressed and about the Esquimalt reserve. At 18 hectares, it is home to 250 people, and supports another 150 people off reserve.


Regina school commemorates victims of residential schools

Published: Aprilá 19, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 20, 2012 - Publication: GlobalNews.com (Regina)

Link http://www.globalregina.com/regina+school+commemorates+victims+of+residential+schools/6442624680/story.html

It was only a few years ago that the history of residential schools started being taught in Saskatchewan’s curriculum, but one Regina school is remembering in a unique way.

One tile represents one life lost.

Seventy five percent of students who attended Sturgeon Landing residential school died during its 50 year history.

“It was everything, the sickness, the suicides, different things, loneliness I’m sure,” said grade five teacher at St. Bernadette Catholic school Karen Goodon.

As part of Project of Heart, 261 lives are commemorated with 261 mosaic tiles.


Can the Indian in the child ever speak: The production of the residential school survivor in media discourse in Canada

Published: Aprilá 20, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 20, 2012 - Publication: Ryerson University web site

Link http://www.ryerson.ca/socialwork/News%20&%20Events/Seminar_Series.html

You are invited to....

The Next Social Work SRC Seminar:

Can the Indian in the child ever speak?: The production of the residential school survivor in media discourse in Canada

A Research Paper presented by visiting scholar and Ryerson School of Social Work Alumnus, Dr. Teresa Macias, Assistant Professor, School of Social Work, University of Victoria.

Thursday May 17, 2012 from 12:00 to 2:00pm in EPH 222

To RSVP for the seminar please contact Kristin Smith at: kristin.smith@ryerson.ca

More Information:
Dr. Macias’ scholarship deals with issues of disappearances, torture, truth commissions and compensation policy. Her research and teaching interests also include ethics of international development and practice, nation and identity making, and anti-oppressive and anti-colonial practice and teaching methods. Her professional and academic experience include 4 years of international development and research work in Latin America as well as life-long involvement in international human rights work, community activism and popular education.


Series Final Installment: Residential school days bring mixed emotions for staff

Published: Aprilá 19, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 20, 2012 - Publication: VicNews.com

Link http://www.vicnews.com/news/148172865.html

“How often did I see them, especially the little six year olds, struggling to jump from the back of the truck, blinded by tears of loneliness and confusion,” wrote the Catholic nun in her written account of those years. “That same truck, however, became a source of freedom and excitement when it was used for picnics … (or) for journeying to pick low-bush cranberries.”

This bittersweet memory is among many written accounts of teaching, nursing and child minding at residential schools by the Sisters of St. Ann, the last of whom are now mostly retired and living in Victoria. It’s a side of the residential school history seldom told, because there is no public forum that welcomes it.

Last weekend, survivors from those schools were invited by the national Truth and Reconciliation Commission to share their memories. On April 13 and 14, dozens of former students spoke about their memories of abuse, shame and loneliness. Roughly 3,000 people came to witness, both from the Aboriginal and wider community.

While school workers were also invited to speak, few dared. Many, however, feel their accounts need to be told.

 


Hopes high that TRC hearings will kick-start new chapter

Published: Aprilá 18, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 19, 2012 - Publication: AnglicanJournal.com

Link http://www.anglicanjournal.com/nc/other/news-items/c/sliders/article/hopes-high-that-trc-hearings-will-kick-start-new-chapter-10677//abp/141.html

An Anglican archbishop has expressed the hope that the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) process will lay the foundation for healing and new relationships of “respect, dignity and understanding” between Canada’s aboriginal and non-aboriginal people."

“My prayer is that truth-telling will begin the journey toward a new chapter for our church and our country,” said Archbishop John Privett in a statement. Privett is bishop of the diocese of Kootenay and metropolitan (senior bishop) of the ecclesiastical province of British Columbia and the Yukon. His statement was read by the diocesan bishop of New Westminster, Michael Ingham, as part of the “Expressions of Reconciliation” session at the TRC regional event in Victoria April 14.

Privett offered an apology to the more than 2,000 survivors of Indian residential schools in the province who attended the event at the Victoria Convention Centre. “I am shocked, saddened and shamed by this legacy and the part our church has played in it,” said Privett, adding that he wanted to echo the words of apology given in 1993 by former primate, Archbishop Michael Peers. “I, too, am deeply sorry for the suffering our church has caused. “


Regional Event in Victoria a Success

Published: Aprilá 18, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 19, 2012 - Publication: Truth and Reconciliation Commission web site

Link http://www.myrobust.com/websites/victoria/index.php?p=518

They came, they spoke and they witnessed.

The Regional Event in Victoria is now a part of history.

In total. 2345 people registered to be part of this event. Of those, nearly 400 identified as former attendess of Residential School, leaving almost 2,000 people who came to hear the truth be told and to share what they have learned with others.

Over 150 statements were provided to the Commission, adding to the documentation that will establish the truth of what happened in the schools.
 


Children teaching parents about Aboriginal culture: UBC study

Published: Aprilá 14, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 18, 2012 - Publication: University of British Columbia press release

Link http://www.publicaffairs.ubc.ca/2012/04/14/children-teaching-parents-about-aboriginal-culture-ubc-study/

In a unique role reversal, children in literacy programs for indigenous families are learning about Aboriginal culture and language and teaching it to their parents – many of whom are missing this knowledge because of Canada’s history of residential schools and child welfare removal policies. This reversal is identified in a new study by researchers at the University of British Columbia.

UBC Faculty of Education researchers Jan Hare and graduate student Nicola Friedrich studied the role of family literacy programming for Indigenous children and families taking part in Canada’s national Aboriginal early intervention program, Aboriginal Head Start (AHS).

“This study suggests that for families from diverse cultural and linguistic communities, there are multiple pathways to learning,” says Hare, who is presenting this research at the American Educational Research Association (AERA) annual meeting in Vancouver. “Children become knowledge brokers, helping their parents navigate the expectations and norms within their families, schools and communities.”


Concerns raised over Founders' Day presentation at Algoma U

Published: Aprilá 17, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 18, 2012 - Publication: SooToday.com

Link http://www.sootoday.com/content/news/details.asp?c=41447

Following the annual Founder's Day Spring Ceremony event held on the Algoma University campus on Monday, April 2, 2012, SASA has been receiving numerous concerns from students, community members, residential school survivors and special guests regarding several comments made during the presentation on the History of Residential Schools, including suggestions that the residential school system was not an act of cultural genocide.

SASA is deeply concerned about the devastating impact these comments have had on our relatives, our partners, our fellow students and ourselves.


Victoria events offer a call to witness residential school legacy

Published: Aprilá 17, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 18, 2012 - Publication: VictoriaNews.com

Link http://www.peninsulanewsreview.com/news/147829035.html

One of the first to take the microphone, Mary Vickars faced a crowd of several hundred as she spoke about the stick her mother often had waiting for her after school.

Vickars is an intergenerational survivor of residential schools, the daughter of a woman who attended St. Michael’s school in Alert Bay near the northern tip of Vancouver Island, between the ages of three and 16.

On Friday at the Victoria Conference Centre, she joined dozens of others from across Vancouver Island who volunteered to speak about their experiences of residential school at the national Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s event in Victoria, April 13 and 14. They spoke for the record, for personal healing and for cross-cultural understanding.


Story cries out for investigation

Published: Aprilá 17, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 17, 2012 - Publication: Victoria Times Colonist

Link http://www.timescolonist.com/news/Story+cries+investigation/6471201/story.html

Re: "A tragic truth hits home," April 14.

The story of the woman who suffered shotgun wounds trying to run away from a residential school cries out for an in-depth investigation, even after all these years.

I was a police officer in B.C. at that time and I was not new to the job. Many questions must be dealt with.

Who issued the firearms and ammunition to the school staff to enable them to shoot down these children who were intent on escaping? Were firearms and ammunition also issued to the many native staff members at these schools? Who were the police officers who must have chosen to ignore reports of gunfire at the school from people both inside and outside the school?

C.E. Scheideman

Saanichton


Residential school probe key to new rapport: Atleo

Published: Aprilá 17, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 17, 2012 - Publication: Victoria Times Colonist

Link http://www.timescolonist.com/life/Residential+school+probe+rapport+Atleo/6471178/story.html

It's time to press the reset button on the relationship between aboriginal and non-aboriginal Canadians, and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission is setting the stage for that change, says Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo.

In Victoria, hundreds of non-aboriginal people packed into rooms at Victoria Conference Centre late last week and listened to stories of horrific abuse at residential schools and brutally honest accounts of intergenerational problems caused by the disruption to culture and families.

Slowly, the realization is dawning that a more respectful relationship is beneficial to everyone, Atleo told an audience of high school students at an education forum organized by the commission.

"When First Nations are healed and supported and economic prosperity has been returned, it will make for a stronger Canada - and that's what we all aspire to," he said. "Let's make this the country it can be, the one our ancestors imagined it could be."

A key is supporting survivors of residential schools and making sure the story of Canada's residential school history is understood by all Canadians, Atleo said.


Where are the stories from the abusers?

Published: Aprilá 17, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 17, 2012 - Publication: Victoria Times Colonist

Link http://www.timescolonist.com/opinion/letters/Where+stories+from+abusers/6471202/story.html

As the stories of the abuse come to light in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission hearings, I keep looking for a response from someone on the other side of the fence.

Are the abusers still alive? How did so many who supposedly were so righteous and God-fearing justify to themselves doing this over and over?

I applaud the courage of the survivors, I grieve that they had to go through it. I decry the cowardice of those who have hidden their sins and complicity under the cover of night and a convenient religion.


Hearings should teach humility, humanity

Published: Aprilá 17, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 17, 2012 - Publication: Victoria Times Colonist

Link http://www.timescolonist.com/opinion/letters/Hearings+should+teach+humility+humanity/6471193/story.html

On Saturday, my wife and I had the rare honour of attending the Truth and Reconciliation Commission regional event.

We listened as courageous witnesses shared their experiences of residential school life or the carnage made apparent in the aftermath. It is shocking that this cultural genocide continued into the 1990s.

Unfortunately, I am all too familiar with genocide, as my parents' families all perished in the Holocaust. Like the Jews and many other cultures who have suffered the injustices of hatred and bigotry, the First Nations people of this country must also be represented accurately. History must reveal to all Canadians the true nature of our misdeeds to those generations of native people, so that our nation's future generations know the meaning of humility and humanity.

Leo Slivka

Oak Bay


Anishinaabe elders adopt Weisgerber

Published: Aprilá 17, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 17, 2012 - Publication: Catholic Register

Link http://www.catholicregister.org/news/canada/item/14277-anishinaabe-elders-adopt-weisgerber

Anishinaabe elders and community leaders adopted Archbishop James Weisgerber of Winnipeg as their brother April 14 in a traditional ceremony at Thunderbird House in Winnipeg, the first event of its kind in the reconciliation between Indian residential school survivors and missionary churches.

As a priest in Saskatchewan, Weisgerber had been a pastoral minister at four of what were then called Indian reserves, "but nobody ever talked about the residential schools," he said. In 1990, Phil Fontaine, former National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations, "made a public declaration and released a huge barrage, and more people began speaking and I began to understand," Weisgerber said.

During the ceremony Fontaine, widely regarded for bringing about the Indian Residential School Agreement in 2005 and the formal apology of the Government of Canada in 2008, offered his own apology to the Catholic Church.

"My bitterness and anger hurt many good people dedicated to our well being and I only focused on the people who hurt us," Fontaine said. "I tarred everyone with the same brush and I was wrong. As you apologized to me on more than one occasion, I apologize to you."

Fontaine was one of four leaders to adopt the archbishop. The others were Tobasonakwut Kinew, an Anishinaabe elder, pipecarrier and a member of the Mideiwin, an aboriginal medicine society; Fred Kelly, an Anishinabe elder and a member of the Mideiwin, and a member of the team that negotiated the Indian Residential School Agreement; and Bert Fontaine, brother of Phil and a leader in the Sagkeeng First Nation. All are residential school survivors.


Winnipeg archbishop symbolically adopted by aboriginal elders

Published: Aprilá 16, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 17, 2012 - Publication: National Catholic Reporter

Link http://ncronline.org/blogs/ncr-today/winnipeg-archbishop-symbolically-adopted-aboriginal-elders

Archbishop James Weisgerber of Winnipeg, former president of the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops, has been in the forefront of apologizing for the past sins of the church and society while trying to heal the wounds of division. On April 29, 2009, he arranged for a personal meeting at the Vatican between Benedict XVI and aboriginal representatives, most who were residential school survivors themselves.

On Saturday, Weisgerber was formally welcomed as a brother into the aboriginal community by elders in a traditional adoption ceremony at Circle of Life Thunderbird House. Derek Nepinak, the grand chief of the Assembly of Manitoba, described the importance of the work that has been done: "The church is demonstrating its open heart, and I think the church is demonstrating a lot of leadership in addressing the reconciliation issues."


JRP Hearings Kicked Off in Rupert for a Second Time

Published: Aprilá 16, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 17, 2012 - Publication: CFTK TV

Link http://www.cftktv.com/News/Story.aspx?ID=1687678

The sound of drumming and singing echoed through the Ceremonial Room of the Museum of Northern BC this morning as the Enbridge Joint Review Panel returned to Prince Rupert for a second time.

Gitxaala First Nations spoke before the panel about keeping their traditional practices alive.

Speaker Doug Brown shared a memory of being taken away from his traditional lands at the age of six.

“We were taken to Alert Bay Indian Residential School. That’s a little island on the northern tip of Vancouver Island. St. Michael’s Indian Residential School in Alert Bay was referred to as the Alcatraz of residential schools. No problem getting out of the building but getting off the island was another story.”


Man jailed for theft from till

Published: Aprilá 17, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 17, 2012 - Publication: Saskatoon Star Phoenix

Link http://www.thestarphoenix.com/news/jailed+theft+from+till/6471072/story.html

A man whose poetry helped him get through his last jail sentence is heading back into the correctional system.

Rocky Bird, 32, was sentenced Monday in Saskatoon provincial court for stealing $90 from an unlocked cash register at the Confederation Inn one week earlier, on April 9.

The Crown and defence jointly recommended a sentence of 15 months in jail for Bird, a residential school survivor whose problems with drugs started when he was a teenager.


Truth and Reconciliation Commission Event Begins Today

Published: Aprilá 13, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 16, 2012 - Publication: United Church of Canada web site

Link http://www.united-church.ca/communications/news/general/120413

Representatives of The United Church of Canada, including former Moderators Marion Best and the Very Rev. Bob Smith, will be participating in a two-day regional event sponsored by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada .

The event, which is being held in Victoria, British Columbia, April 13–14, will be streamed live as a webcast , and will also feature highlights from each day.

This gathering follows regional hearings held in four communities across Vancouver Island where survivors, their families, and community members shared stories about the impact of residential schools on their lives.


Couple pleads hardship to judge

Published: Aprilá 14, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 16, 2012 - Publication: Edmonton Journal

Link http://www.edmontonjournal.com/Couple+pleads+hardship+judge/6459027/story.html

A Manitoba couple awaiting sentencing for starving their granddaughter spoke about the hardships they have faced as aboriginal people, as they made their sentencing submissions Friday.

Regina Court of Queen's Bench Justice Frank Gerein previously heard submissions from Crown prosecutor Mitch Crumley, who is asking that a sentence of between four and five years be imposed against the 52-year-old woman and the 55-year-old man on a charge of failing to provide the necessaries of life to the man's young granddaughter.

Pre-sentence reports had been ordered and Gerein had also earlier ensured the couple - who are self-represented - received copies of recent Supreme Court decisions regarding "Gladue factors," which judges are supposed to take into consideration when sentencing aboriginal offenders.

Judges have been directed to consider such matters as the impact of colonialism and residential schools and how that has led to systemic problems among aboriginal people.

Speaking separately, the couple said the Gladue factors certainly pertain to them, the woman speaking about a history in her family of substance abuse and a background that included residential school. It's believed the grandfather also spent time in residential school, although neither provided much detail about their time there.


Hearings reopen old wounds for residential school survivor

Published: Aprilá 13, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 16, 2012 - Publication: Globe and Mail

Link http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/hearings-reopen-old-wounds-for-residential-school-survivor/article2402388/?utm_medium=Feeds%3A%20RSS%2FAtom&utm_source=Home&utm_content=2402388

One of British Columbia's most prominent aboriginal leaders wept uncontrollably as he told Canada's truth and reconciliation commission that he never fully realized the impact of Indian residential schools on his life until he heard survivors recount their own experiences at the hearings.

Grand Chief Ed John, leader of the First Nations Summit, said on Friday that the stories he heard while the commission was in Inuvik, N.W.T., tore open wounds he had not known were there.

“I never realized the depth of my own story until I heard their stories,” said Mr. John, who stood back from the podium, tried to start speaking again, but couldn't as the tears flowed. “It haunts me.”

Mr. John, who is the leader of B.C.’s largest aboriginal organization, spoke at the opening of the commission's two-day stop in Victoria, which as many as 2,000 survivors and their families are expected to attend.


We carried this with us all our lives

Published: Aprilá 14, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 16, 2012 - Publication: Victoria Times Colonist

Link http://www.timescolonist.com/news/carried%20this%20with%20lives/6459565/story.html

At night, as he struggled with the loneliness of residential school, Eric Pelkey would wrap himself tightly in his sheet so the abusive dorm supervisor couldn't reach him as easily.

"When I went there, I wondered why they kept referring to me as handsome and, after about three months, it started. I woke up one night and he was sexually abusing me," Pelkey, of the Tsawout First Nation, told one of the packed rooms at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in Victoria on Friday.


Ghosts of Residential Schools Past Arrive in Victoria

Published: Aprilá 13, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 16, 2012 - Publication: CTV Vancouver Island.ca

Link http://www.ctvvancouverisland.ca/2012/04/ghosts-of-residential-schools-past-arrive-in-victoria/

It may have been sunny but one of the blackest clouds in Canadian history returned to the Capital Friday.

The final two-day leg of Vancouver Island’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission began Friday.

The Victoria event follows stops in Port Hardy and Duncan earlier this year. A national event is scheduled to be held in BC sometime in September 2013.


Many paths to healing scars of past

Published: Aprilá 14, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 16, 2012 - Publication: Vancouver Sun

Link http://www.vancouversun.com/entertainment/Many+paths+healing+scars+past/6457991/story.html

There were too many painful memories for Matilda Robinson to look at the paintings she created while a student at Alberni Indian Residential School.

But her daughter is gaining insight into her mother's nightmares as she looks at the detailed depiction of Nitinat Lake.

"It absolutely reflects that she was missing home awfully," said Tammy Pearce, who saw her mother's paintings for the first time last week.

The paintings, created between 1958 and 1960, are on display at the Victoria Conference Centre. Viewing them helps to bridge the gap between generations, said Pearce, who grew up knowing little of her mother's Dididaht culture.


Emotional statement opens Truth and Reconciliation hearings in Victoria

Published: Aprilá 13, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 16, 2012 - Publication: CBC.ca

Link http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/story/2012/04/13/bc-victoria-truth-reconciliation.html

A top B.C. native leader broke down in tears today during his opening remarks to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission hearings in Victoria on Friday.

First Nations Summit Grand Chief Ed John could barely finish his remarks as he looked out into the audience and said he's still haunted by the residential school experience.

John wiped away tears and didn't start speaking again until other aboriginal leaders joined him on stage to offer support.


Two letters to the Editor

Published: Aprilá 14, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 16, 2012 - Publication: Winnipeg Free Press

Link http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/opinion/letters_to_the_editor/have-your-say-147422295.html

An arrogant opinion

In response to Cal Paul's April 9 letter, History well taught, I would like to express my disgust and frustration at such an arrogant opinion. Obviously Paul has never been through or known anyone who has been abused sexually, physically, culturally or emotionally.

It is true that many aboriginals who were able to relive their traumatic experiences were "financially compensated." But that certainly doesn't buy the victims happy childhood memories or take away the shame and humiliation that was bestowed upon them.

I am all for Mark Wasyliw's suggestion to not only have a day to remember the victims of residential school programs, but also to remind the offenders of their wrongdoings, to remind all the victims that they are true survivors and to say thank you for giving the rest of us Anishinawbek people more determination, will and strength to continue to keep our culture alive and be proud of who we are, no matter what.

CHRISTINE BARKER

Hollow Water First Nation

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Along with my University of Manitoba colleagues Henry Heller, professor of history, and Peter Kulchyski, professor of native studies, I am writing as a political studies professor to endorse the proposal made by Winnipeg School Division trustee Mark Wasyliw that there be more education about the history of residential schools in Winnipeg schools and that the statement of apology be commemorated appropriately.

His proposal is timely and important. We must acknowledge the harm done by these schools to the vital and growing First Nations communities in Winnipeg and Manitoba. This acknowledgement will enable the rest of us to recognize the great odds against which these communities still struggle and to support their struggles with solidarity.

Finally, the suppression of important parts of this history of our society is also detrimental to our self-understanding and our ability to deal with social, economic and political problems that will inevitably arise from such a profound wrong.

RADHIKA DESAI

Winnipeg


Sometimes the telling causes too much pain

Published: Aprilá 14, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 16, 2012 - Publication: Victoria Times Colonist

Link http://www.timescolonist.com/life/Sometimes+telling+causes+much+pain/6459590/story.html

Recently, there has been a lot of discussion about the value of telling and listening to the experiences of people who were involved in the Indian residential schools.

I applaud the courage and strength required to tell and listen to these experiences. As a person who has had the privilege of knowing many survivors, I can hardly begin to say how they and their families have changed me as a person.

They have been my teachers and for that I will be eternally grateful.


Fontaine apolgizes to Catholics during reconciliation ceremony

Published: Aprilá 14, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 16, 2012 - Publication: Winnipeg Free Press

Link http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/breakingnews/Fontaine-apologizes-to-Catholics-during-reconciliation-ceremony-147450135.html

A sombre Phil Fontaine apologized Saturday afternoon for indiscriminately blaming all Catholics for his treatment in residential schools.

"I tarred everyone with the same brush -- I was wrong, simply wrong," the former Assembly of First Nations national chief told a gathering of reconciliation at Thunderbird House. "I apologize. I say that from my heart."

Fontaine was part of a traditional ceremony, in which he and three other men adopted Archbishop James Weisgerber as an act of reconciliation.


Residential school survivors take part in historic ceremony with Archbishop

Published: Aprilá 14, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 16, 2012 - Publication: CTV Winnipeg.ca

Link http://winnipeg.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20120414/wpg_adoption_ceremony_120414/20120414/?hub=WinnipegHome

First Nations communities and the Catholic church took a historic step towards reconciliation together Saturday afternoon.

First Nations communities hosted an open reconciliation ceremony at Thunderbird House with the help of the Archbishop of Winnipeg.

Reverend James Weisgerber, the Archbishop of Winnipeg, was welcomed as a brother by Aboriginal elders in an ancient adoption ceremony.

Anishinaabe elders and community leaders Phil Fontaine, Bert Fontaine, Fred Kelly and Tobasonakwut Kinew ceremonially adopted Weisgerber at the public event.


Archbishop delights in his new brothers

Published: Aprilá 16, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 16, 2012 - Publication: Winnipeg Free Press

Link http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/archbishop-delights-in-his-new-brothers-147546535.html

Archdiocese of Winnipeg Archbishop James Weisgerber was the central figure at Thunderbird House Saturday, still humbled and trying to come to grips with the generosity of spirit that would allow aboriginal people to show forgiveness for the church's role in residential schools.

Weisgerber was adopted Saturday as a brother by Bert and Phil Fontaine, and elders Fred Kelly and Tobasonakwut Kinew, the first such traditional Naabaagoodiwin ceremony celebrated as an act of reconciliation.


Winnipeg archbishop adopted by First Nation

Published: Aprilá 15, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 16, 2012 - Publication: CBC.ca (Manitoba)

Link http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/story/2012/04/15/mb-aboriginal-catholic-adoption.html

Aboriginal elders in Winnipeg have symbolically adopted a Roman Catholic archbishop, in a powerful gesture of reconciliation following the residential schools experience.

Archbishop James Weisgerber, head of the Archdiocese of Winnipeg, was adopted by a group of elders and former residential school students in a traditional Ojibway ceremony on Saturday.

"He's accepted the invitation to be a part of our family, be part of our community — to be, in fact, a real brother in this large, very large extended family," said Phil Fontaine, former national chief of the Assembly of First Nations, who was among those who took part in the adoption ceremony.


Truth and Consequences in the Land of Nothing

Published: Aprilá 14, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 16, 2012 - Publication: SalemNews.com

Link http://www.salem-news.com/articles/april142012/land-of-nothing-ka.php

I’ve been ignoring the orchestrated circus calling itself the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, but now that it’s meeting in my own backyard, I’ve been asked to comment.

Frankly, it’s all quite the déjà vu experience. The travesty going on this weekend in Victoria reminds me of a story told to me by one of the few survivors who hasn’t been gagged.

When the children weren’t being starved, raped and tortured to death, they were dressed in decent clothing every Sunday and paraded in front of a smiling and appreciative middle-class congregation at the local United Church. And there, to the happy amusement of the official Christians, the boys and girls of the Edmonton Indian Residential School would sing hymns of praise to Jesus.

After they had performed for the Christians, the children would return to the school, where half of them would die.

Those who did survive are still performing for us, because we still desperately need to smile on Indians and think good of ourselves. That’s really why we created the misnamed “Truth and Reconciliation Commission”: to reassure ourselves that we aren’t, in fact, murderers.


Reconciliation on Residential Schools

Published: Aprilá 14, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 16, 2012 - Publication: Winnipeg Sun

Link http://www.winnipegsun.com/2012/04/14/reconciliation-on-residential-schools

A delegation of First Nations elders ceremonially adopted James Weisgerber, the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Winnipeg on Saturday, April 14, 2012, in a gesture of reconciliation between residential school survivors and missionary churches. The Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs said this was the first event of its kind.


What about perpetrators of native school abuse

Published: Aprilá 15, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 16, 2012 - Publication: Victoria Times Colonist

Link http://www.timescolonist.com/news/What+about+perpetrators+native+school+abuse/6462271/story.html

In all of the recent publicity given to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, much has been written about the victims of residential schools, but remarkably little regarding the perpetrators of the physical and sexual violence inflicted on those in their care.


Native American tribe adopts Canadian prelate

Published: Aprilá 16, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 16, 2012 - Publication: CatholicCulture.org

Link http://www.catholicculture.org/news/headlines/index.cfm?storyid=14006

Archbishop James Weisgerber of Winnipeg has been adopted by members of the Ojibway tribe in a ceremony intended to promote reconciliation between the Church and Canada’s First Nations (Native Americans).


Archbishop to be adopted into aboriginal community

Published: Aprilá 13, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 13, 2012 - Publication: Winnipeg Free Press

Link http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/archbishop-to-be-adopted-into-aboriginal-community-147282915.html

A Catholic archbishop who arranged a private meeting with the Pope for Canadian residential school survivors says he is humbled and honoured by his upcoming adoption into the aboriginal community.

"This is a commitment to be a brother. This is a strong commitment," said Archbishop James Weisgerber, archbishop of the Roman Catholic diocese of Winnipeg. "It will help lead reconciliation between our communities."

Weisgerber will be adopted by two sets of brothers who already consider each other kin: Phil Fontaine, former national chief of the Assembly of First Nations, his brother, Bert Fontaine, and Anishinaabe elders and brothers Fred Kelly and Tobasonakwut Kinew. The ceremony is scheduled for 1 p.m. Saturday at Thunderbird House.


Survivors to speak at truth and reconciliation hearings in Victoria

Published: Aprilá 13, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 13, 2012 - Publication: CBC.ca (British Columbia)

Link http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/story/2012/04/13/bc-victoria-truth-reconciliation.html?cmp=rss

Survivors of Canada's residential school system are gathering in Victoria for two days of hearings by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada.

As many as 2,000 survivors and their families are expected to attend the event, which will include traditional ceremonies and survivor gatherings, as well as formal statements and an education day.


Commission wrapping up Island visit this weekend

Published: Aprilá 13, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 13, 2012 - Publication: Canada.com (Postmedia News)

Link http://www.canada.com/Commission+wrapping+Island+visit+this+weekend/6452043/story.html

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) winds up its Vancouver Island tour with a twoday event in Victoria starting Friday, April 13.

The three-person commission is set to welcome more than 2,000 residential school survivors and their families to the TRC's regional session at the Empress Hotel.

This event will provide a final opportunity on Vancouver Island for residential school survivors, their family members, former teachers, those who worked in the schools or anyone who has information on the schools to share their truth with the commission.


Residential School Survivors Set To Detail Abuse

Published: Aprilá 12, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 13, 2012 - Publication: CTV.ca (Vancouver Island)

Link http://www.ctvvancouverisland.ca/2012/04/residential-school-survivors-set-to-detail-abuse/

Survivors of native residential schools on south Vancouver Island are preparing to share their heartbreaking stories of abuse.

Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission has made its way down the island, and is in Victoria Friday and Saturday – ready to listen.

And the commission is hoping you are too. The event at the Victoria Conference Centre is open to the public.


Her job is listening to stories of survival

Published: Aprilá 13, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 13, 2012 - Publication: Victoria Times Colonist

Link http://www.timescolonist.com/listening+stories+survival/6453231/story.html

There are times that Truth and Reconciliation Commissioner Marie Wilson finishes a day of hearings and heads for a hot bath and a good cry.

"My job, in some ways, is easy because I say to myself: 'All I have to do is hear this. I didn't have to live it.' So that helps a lot," said Wilson, who shares the task of listening to the stories with commission chairman Justice Murray Sinclair and Chief Wilton Littlechild.

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada was formed as part of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement with the mandate to inform Canadians about what happened in the schools. It has federal government support in an effort to facilitate reconciliation and understanding between aboriginal people and Canadians.

The TRC regional event will be held at Victoria Conference Centre and the Fairmont Empress today and Saturday.


Don't mess with children

Published: Aprilá 13, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 13, 2012 - Publication: Ottawa Citizen

Link http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/mess+with+children/6451111/story.html

Education is a powerful weapon. Unlike the colonial-centric "history" we were force-fed, today's aboriginal studies curriculum is more historically accurate. Students are learning Canada's dirty little secrets about our treatment of the First Nation. And they are not happy, particularly about the discrimination and inequity in funding that affects children just like them. Stephen Harper, be warned. Don't mess with kids.

I wrote a book for young people, Shannen and the Dream for a School, based on the true story of Shannen Koostachin of Attawapiskat. In 2007, her Grade 8 class campaigned to get their temporary portables replaced after our government broke a third promise to build a new school. Children do not like broken promises. The class travelled to Ottawa to meet with the Minister of Indian Affairs. After being told they weren't a priority, Shannen spoke out. People listened.

It is the horror of residential schools that really boggles their minds. How could this have happened in Canada?

Last week, I visited Grade 6 students who had formed a club, the Dream Catchers, to support Shannen's Dream. "In my opinion, since we took their land and they helped the settlers survive, native people should receive more funding, not less," one boy said. When I mentioned the diamond mine near Attawapiskat, the class groaned. More hands flapped in the air. I wanted to hear their questions, but I had positive and hopeful stories to share.

When children stand up and speak the truth, they are impossible to ignore. Perhaps they don't grasp the complexities of problems. They are not overwhelmed by the impossibilities of the task ahead. Children are too young to be bogged down by history and have not yet learned to be racist. Their simplistic views may be dismissed as childish. But, as child prodigy Adora Svitak said, "The world needs 'childish' thinking: bold ideas, wild creativity, and especially optimism. We need to listen, as well as learn from kids."


Put an end to Racist Law

Published: Aprilá 12, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 13, 2012 - Publication: Winnipeg Sun

Link http://www.winnipegsun.com/2012/04/12/the-law-is-racist-brodbeck

Dear Rob Nicholson:

As Canada’s justice minister and attorney general, I’m sure you are keenly aware of the recent Supreme Court of Canada ruling on Sec. 718(2) of the Criminal Code.

This is the one that forces courts to give aboriginal offenders special consideration during sentencing.

The trouble is, Sec. 718(2) has very little meaning on its own, especially the edict that calls on the courts to give “particular attention to the circumstances of Aboriginal offenders” when sentencing.

For example, courts are to automatically consider as mitigating factors such things as the effects of colonialism, residential schools, displacement and other historical wrongdoings against aboriginal people. The courts are to consider these matters as mitigating factors whether they can be proven as relevant to the individual offender or not.

The aboriginal offender, under this judge-made law, is to be treated differently based on his or her race and ancestry.

Mr. Nicholson, that is not the Canada I grew up in. The Canada I grew up in strived for equality of rights among Canadians, including racial equality.

I strongly urge you to take action against this race-based section of the Criminal Code and table an amendment in Parliament to address it at your earliest opportunity. Thank You.

Regards,

Tom Brodbeck


Songhees people will host, but few expected to speak

Published: Aprilá 12, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 13, 2012 - Publication: VicNews.com

Link http://www.vicnews.com/news/147233775.html

As the Truth and Reconciliation Commission begins gathering statements from former students of residential schools, Songhees band member Butch Dick will stand beside any family member who chooses to tell their story.

He won’t, however, tell his own.

“I’ve never brought it to my family because I feel I will just carry it on to another generation,” Dick says. “My children don’t need to know. They know that I went there, but they don’t need to know all the stories because they don’t need to carry that.”

Dick has not registered to speak, but has played a supporting role as a local planning committee member to the commission’s Victoria hearings, happening today (April 13) and tomorrow at the Victoria Conference Centre.


First Nations Justice (Letter to the Editor)

Published: Aprilá 12, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 12, 2012 - Publication: Vancouver Province

Link http://www.theprovince.com/opinion/First+Nations+justice/6445967/story.html

When I was a criminology student, the question of how the Canadian justice system could find a fit with First Nations was a hot topic for two reasons.

The most complicated reason involved treaties, treaty negotiations and definitions of the con-sequences of criminal actions.

However, the most disturbing reason was found in the generations of abuse and torment suffered by First Nations during the residential school era - and the resulting epidemic of dysfunctional drug, alcohol and institutionalized, abusive behaviours.


Regional Event in Victoria Set to Begin

Published: Aprilá 11, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 12, 2012 - Publication: Truth and Reconciliation Commission web site

Link http://www.trc.ca/websites/trcinstitution/index.php?p=3

The Regional Event in Victoria follows Regional Hearings held in four communities across Vancouver Island where Survivors, intergenerational Survivors and community members either shared their truth or bore witness to that truth. Victoria will be a larger opportunity to do the same, while drawing attention from a wider Canadian audience through media and webcasting.


Residential school system probe in Victoria for hearings

Published: Aprilá 12, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 12, 2012 - Publication: Victoria Times Colonist

Link http://www.timescolonist.com/entertainment/Residential+school+system+probe+Victoria+hearings/6446363/story.html

The heart of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's regional event in Victoria Friday and Saturday will be emotionally charged statements from residential school survivors and their families as they explain the legacy of generations of children taken from their homes.

But Ry Moran, TRC director of statement gathering, is hoping the commission will also be reaching into homes and communities where little thought has been given to Canada's history of residential schools.

"We, as Canadians, are part of the residential school system, even though some of us don't realize it," Moran said. "Maybe this is a chance to come and own a bit of this history and understand it. It's our history and it's not a pretty history in many ways."


Residential school hearings begin in Tuktoyaktuk

Published: Aprilá 11, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 12, 2012 - Publication: CBC.ca (North)

Link http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/story/2012/04/11/north-trc-beaufort-delta.html

The Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission is holding hearings in the Beaufort-Delta region of the Northwest Territories this week and next.

Jennifer Hunt-Poitras, co-director of the Inuit subcommission, said the meetings were not part of the original plan, but were added because the communities asked for them.


Telling of experiences helps the healing (Letter to the Editor)

Published: Aprilá 12, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 12, 2012 - Publication: Victoria Times Colonist

Link http://www.timescolonist.com/opinion/letters/Telling+experiences+helps+healing/6446394/story.html

Acts of humiliation, beating, rape and murder continue to this day in our communities, whatever our ancestry. This is a huge issue for all of us as Canadians, and it is not an "Indian problem." The people who perpetrated the crimes against the young children in the residential-school system were not aboriginal people.

First Nations peoples and their strength in their telling of the horrific truths through the Truth and Reconciliation Commission hearings are giving us a special opportunity to understand what abuse has done to all of our families and continues to do to the social fabric of Canada.


Jesuits participate in residential school gathering

Published: Aprilá 10, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 12, 2012 - Publication: Anishinabe Spiritual Centre web site

Link http://anishinabespiritualcentre.ca/jesuits-participate-in-residential-school-gathering

This past March 9th to 11th, 2012, Spanish, Ontario was host to the St. Charles Garnier & St. Joseph’s Residential School Gathering. St. Charles Garnier was the boys’ school in Spanish, which was owned and operated by the Jesuits between 1913 and 1958. One of the organizers of the reunion was Pauline Toulouse, a member of the Diocesan Order of Service (DOS) and participant in the Anishinabe Spiritual Centre’s Ministries Programme. Fr. David Shulist SJ and Paul Robson SJ attended and participated in the event, as did Justin Dittrick, a Jesuit Volunteer. Fr. David celebrated the Mass on Sunday, and Paul helped design the program for the event.

The theme for the weekend was “Remembering the Good Times”, and there was a spirit of positivity and moving forward about the reunion. There was also a spirit of humour, with a performance and workshop by comedian Leonard Dick (“Moccasin Joe”). Speeches by honourary guests mentioned both the bad but also the many good experiences that alumni had had at the schools. Chief Isadore Day of Serpent River First Nation spoke about the necessity of not remaining stuck in the past.


Bullying, online learning under microscope at conference

Published: Aprilá 12, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 12, 2012 - Publication: Vancouver Sun

Link http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Bullying+online+learning+under+microscope+conference/6446139/story.html

Thousands of academics from around the world are gathering in Vancouver for a five-day conference that will feature the latest education discoveries on topics ranging from online learning and charter schools to bullying, racism and student activism.

The annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), which is the largest gathering of education researchers in the world, starts Friday.

The conference includes a lecture by Jo-Ann Archibald, associate dean for indigenous education at the University of B.C. She will discuss how educators can promote a better understanding of the aboriginal history of colonization, residential schools and the denial of culture and language through government policy.

"This type of information ... needs to be known by educators and people who are working in faculties of education and graduate studies in order that we can have some understanding of the issues that parents and communities face today," she said.


Hearings are shining a light on a dark legacy (op-ed)

Published: Aprilá 12, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 12, 2012 - Publication: Victoria Times Colonist

Link http://www.timescolonist.com/opinion/op-ed/Hearings+shining+light+dark+legacy/6446392/story.html

Imagine that a foreign country invaded Canada. These invaders see you as an "uncivilized threat" so they abduct your children when they turn six years old. You hide them, but get caught and are put in jail. Your children are moved into a residential school far away. They are forced to have a new name. Your daughter's beautiful hair is cut off and DDT is put on her head. They are hit when they speak English or say their real names.

In the school, your children are treated like slaves and do menial labour such as scrubbing, carrying heavy slop buckets and agricultural field work. They go hungry while the staff gets the farm-fresh vegetables. When your children return home, they are anxious, malnourished and traumatized. By the time they grow up and are allowed to live with you again, they are thinking and speaking like the invaders.

In part, this is what native people endured in B.C for many decades.


Residential school survivors tell their truths in Victoria

Published: Aprilá 10, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 11, 2012 - Publication: OakBayNews.com

Link http://www.oakbaynews.com/news/146745455.html

Up to 3,000 people are expected to participate in a Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada event at the Victoria Conference Centre on Friday (April 13).

The public can attend the two-day event, which is mandated, in part, to inform Canadians about what happened during the nearly 150-year history of residential schools.

This understanding aims to guide and inspire a process of reconciliation and renewed relationship, according to the  terms of the commission.


Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement Update for April 4, 2012

Published: Aprilá 04, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 11, 2012 - Publication: NationTalk.ca

Link http://www.nationtalk.ca/modules/news/article.php?storyid=52860

Update for April 4, 2012:

Two Institutions Added to the List of Indian Residential Schools

The Court has determined that two institutions in northwestern Ontario meet the eligibility criteria set out in Article 12 of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement and are now considered Indian Residential Schools under the Agreement:

• Stirland Lake High School (Wahbon Bay Academy) (for the period September 1, 1971 to June 30, 1991)
• Cristal Lake High School (for the period September 1, 1976 to June 30, 1986)


TRC regional event to open in Victoria, BC

Published: Aprilá 10, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 11, 2012 - Publication: AnglicanJournal.com

Link http://www.anglicanjournal.com/nc/other/news-items/c/sliders/article/trc-regional-event-to-open-in-victoria-bc-10661//abp/141.html

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) is expecting more than 2,000 survivors of residential schools to share their experiences at its first regional event April 13-14 in Victoria, B.C.

The Victoria gathering, preceded by four other regional hearings in Port Hardy, Port Alberni, Campbell River and Cowichan, will allow survivors unable to attend a national event to share their story.

Anglican church representatives will speak at sessions on “Expressions of Reconciliation” and “It Matters to Me, A Call to Action on Reconciliation.”

Among other things, Anglicans from the diocese have been knitting dozens of prayer shawls which will be presented to the TRC at a session on “Gestures of Reconciliation,” said Henriette Thompson, the Anglican church’s public witness coordinator for social justice.


Forum focuses on Indian residential school reconciliation

Published: Aprilá 11, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 11, 2012 - Publication: Vernon Morning Star

Link http://www.vernonmorningstar.com/community/146897695.html

The Indian residential school experience has motivated some Enderby area residents to work towards a future of mutual respect.

More than 70 people turned out to A.L. Fortune Secondary April 4 to attend a forum on the Indian residential schools legacy and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s interim recommendations.

“Healing is something the First Nations must do for themselves, each in their own time,” said Wayne Christian, Splatsin First Nation chief.

“The non-aboriginal community can help by being there to give witness to the truth without ascribing blame.”


Letter to the Editor

Published: Aprilá 11, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 11, 2012 - Publication: Winnipeg Free Press

Link http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/opinion/letters_to_the_editor/have-your-say-146945785.html

While the Canadian government has specifically apologized to former residential school students, this was an act that should be seen more widely as an apology for governmental policy toward aboriginals in general. With this, our governments need to raise their stake in ending the persistent discrimination against Canadian aboriginals, in both institutions and social policy.


Policy: A Snapshot of the Residential Schools

Published: Aprilá 10, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 11, 2012 - Publication: PsychologySalon.com

Link http://www.psychologysalon.com/2012/04/policy-snapshot-of-residential-schools.html

Every Canadian knows at least a little about the bleak history of the residential schools. Children of First Nations families were forcibly removed from their families and made to attend these schools, often in communities far from home. The schools, it turns out, were rife with physical and sexual abuse of the children. Even had they not been, the simple act of forcibly splitting up families was damaging enough.

Non-native people know the story, and most shake their heads at the policy. But without first-hand experience it can be hard to really understand or connect with what happened. Few Canadians have seen even a single artifact from that time.


Victoria artist explores shared pain experienced in residential schools through art

Published: Aprilá 10, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 11, 2012 - Publication: SaanichNews.com

Link http://www.saanichnews.com/news/146746375.html

When the prime minister apologized on behalf of the Government of Canada to former students of residential schools, Peter Morin took the morning off work to listen.

In hearing Stephen Harper’s words, he felt a great weight lifted from his chest, despite having never attended a residential school.

Morin, a Tahltan artist, first assumed the weight he felt was for the aboriginal foster kids and their families, with whom he worked as an advocate at that time – kids, he said, who are are still being removed and placed in non-aboriginal foster homes.

“I thought, OK, that’s why,” says Morin, remembering his emotions from that day in June 2008. “Then I thought, no, that was mine. That was my own weight connected to this intergenerational shame and trauma.”

Morin is Open Space Gallery’s aboriginal curator. Hearing the apology inspired him in 2009 to create 12 performance art “interventions” exploring the spiritual pain of residential schools.

“I needed to understand my own connection,” says the 34 year old, whose Tahltan Nation homeland is located at Telegraph Creek in Northern B.C.


Residential school stories must be heard

Published: Aprilá 11, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 11, 2012 - Publication: Victoria Times Colonist

Link http://www.timescolonist.com/Residential+school+stories+must+heard/6440653/story.html

Re: "It's up to all of us to bear witness to history," April 8.

I implore all non-indigenous people to heed Maxine Matilpi's heartfelt request that we attend the Truth and Reconciliation Commission hearings that will take place in Victoria on April 13 and 14.

When the hearings are heard in Victoria, we will have an opportunity to listen to, absorb and feel, to the best of our ability, the unimaginable suffering of the defenceless children who were stolen from their families, their language, their culture. We must come to understand the impact of the residential schools on the current social reality. Then we must carry that knowledge forward.


Trying to heal

Published: Aprilá 08, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 10, 2012 - Publication: TbNewsWatch.com

Link http://www.tbnewswatch.com/entertainment/201572/Trying-to-heal

Stanislaus Albert Stevens hasn’t fully healed from his four years he spent in a residential school.

When he was 12 years old, he spent four years at a residential school away from family and forced to speak and learn a way of life he wasn’t familiar with. His nickname was Popeye and he said he would have to follow a strict route of prayers, chores and studies.

The 62-year-old survivor attended a memorial service for those children who didn’t make it out of the schools at Vicker’s Park on Sunday. He along with his daughter joined more than 20 people as they sang and prayed for those who never went home.

Albert Stevens said the service helped to heal him by having some of that anger that he felt subside.

But he said there’s still more he needs to do.
 


Nobody's Children: A MÚtis Nation Residential School Dialogue

Published: Aprilá 10, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 10, 2012 - Publication: MÚtis National Council President's Newsletter April 2012

Link http://www.metisnation.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/April-2012-Reduced-Size-2.pdf

Métis residential/boarding and day school survivors were joined by Métis Nation leadership and fellow citizens in Saskatoon, SK., for a two-day Métis Nation Residential School Dialogue titled, “Nobody’s Children”. This gathering was the first time that survivors from across the Homeland were brought together in a safe place to share, learn and lean on one another as the Métis Nation took it’s first collective step on the journey towards healing.

Métis National Council President Clément Chartier says that the hurt runs deep. “As a people we have faced many challenges, but nothing has been more personal and hurtful than the lack of recognition for our people who attended Métis residential and boarding schools. It is a continuing struggle trying to convince the federal government to do the right thing for all Aboriginal peoples, including the Métis.


Metis National Council calls for reconciliation for Metis Residential School students

Published: Aprilá 02, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 10, 2012 - Publication: APTN National News

Link http://aptn.ca/pages/news/2012/04/02/metis-national-council-calls-for-reconciliation-for-metis-residential-school-students/

The Metis National Council is meeting in Saskatoon to discuss issues surrounding the Metis experience in residential schools and how to push for official reconciliation.

Thousands of Metis children attended residential schools, but were not included in the official 2008 apology from the Canadian federal government.

APTN National News reporter Delaney Windigo has the details.  (Introduction to a video of 2:49 in duration.)


Residential School Deadline for IAP Applications is September 19, 2012

Published: Aprilá 10, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 10, 2012 - Publication: Netnewsledger.com

Link http://netnewsledger.com/2012/04/10/residential-school-deadline-for-iap-applications-is-september-19-2012/

Individuals who attended Canada’s Residential Schools have a process to go through for resolving claims related to abuse suffered during their time at the schools. There are a number of important dates to keep in mind for those persons as well.

September 19, 2012 is the Deadline for former Indian Residential Schools students to apply for an Independent Assessment Process (IAP) payment. The Independent Assessment Process (IAP) is an out-of-court process created to resolve claims of abuse at Indian Residential Schools. People who suffered sexual abuse, serious physical abuse, or certain other wrongful acts which caused serious psychological consequences while at a recognized residential school may receive money through the IAP. Awards are based on a point system for different abuses and resulting harms.


Important Deadline Approaching in Canada's Indian Residential School Settlement

Published: Aprilá 10, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 10, 2012 - Publication: Residential School Settlement press release

Link http://www.newswire.ca/en/story/952279/important-deadline-approaching-in-canada-s-indian-residential-school-settlement

September 19, 2012 is the Deadline for former Indian Residential Schools students to apply for an Independent Assessment Process (IAP) payment. The Independent Assessment Process (IAP) is an out-of-court process created to resolve claims of abuse at Indian Residential Schools. People who suffered sexual abuse, serious physical abuse, or certain other wrongful acts which caused serious psychological consequences while at a recognized residential school may receive money through the IAP. Awards are based on a point system for different abuses and resulting harms.


Residential school hearings in Saskatchewan - April 3, 2012

Published: Aprilá 03, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 10, 2012 - Publication: Saskatchewan Government and General Employees's Union web site

Link http://www.sgeu.org/news/residential-school-hearings-saskatchewan-april-3-2012

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada is holding a round of hearings open to the public to learn and share what happened in the residential schools.

The Commission hopes to guide and inspire First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples and Canadians in a process of truth and healing leading toward reconciliation and renewed relationships based on mutual understanding and respect. 

The next round of Saskatchewan hearings will take place:

April 3 - 5 - Onion Lake

April 30 - May 1 - North Battleford

May 3-5 - Beauval

May 5 - Ile-a-la-Crosse

May 14 -15 - Fort Qu'Appelle

May 17-18 - Buffalo Narrows

June 5, 6, 7 - Lac La Ronge

June 21, 22, 23, 24 - National Event, Saskatoon.


Winnipeg school trustee pushes for more education on residential school legacy

Published: Aprilá 09, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 10, 2012 - Publication: APTN National News

Link http://aptn.ca/pages/news/2012/04/09/winnipeg-school-trustee-pushes-for-more-education-on-residential-schools-legacy/

A Winnipeg school trustee says that Canada’s schools need to recognize the legacy of residential schools, in a manner similar to the way Remembrance Day is observed.

Mark Wasyliw says that every school should have a copy of the 2008 residential schools apology framed and posted on the walls, and is calling for an annual assembly to teach children about residential schools.

APTN National News reporter Matt Thordarson sat down with Wasyliw to talk about his initiative, and how he sees the legacy of residential schools every day in his work.  (Introduction to a video of 3:15 in duration.)


It's up to all of us to bear witness to history

Published: Aprilá 08, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 10, 2012 - Publication: Victoria Times Colonist

Link http://www.timescolonist.com/news/bear+witness+history/6427415/story.html

In February, I attended the Truth and Reconciliation Commission hearing in my northern Vancouver Island Kwakiutl community of Fort Rupert. Although the event was open to the public, I was disappointed at how few nonindigenous people attended.

In a room of more than 100 people, there were maybe six non-indigenous people, including two Anglican ministers and my husband. I wondered about this absence of people of good conscience, those who consider themselves moral citizens and who are proud to call themselves Canadians.

On April 13 and 14, Vancouver Islanders get another chance when the Truth and Reconciliation Commission will be hosting a regional hearing in Victoria, billed as, "an opportunity for all Canadians, both aboriginal and non-aboriginal, to learn more about and bear witness to the legacy of the residential school system."

My husband and I will find the time to be there, to listen, to bear witness.

Will you?


The Residential Schools Healing Workshops

Published: Aprilá 10, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 10, 2012 - Publication: Tobacco Healing Center

Link http://tobaccohealingcentre.com/2012/04/10/the-residential-schools-healing-workshops/

The Residential Schools Healing Workshops was funded by Health Canada for the purposes of testing the community response to the Walk of Life deep healing instrument which is both therapeutic device and cultural ceremony.


Hishuk Ish Tsawalk: Everything is One

Published: Aprilá 06, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 10, 2012 - Publication: The Dominion

Link http://www.dominionpaper.ca/articles/4417

Kathy Robinson is a language warrior. At the age of 81, she is one of the last two fluent native speakers of Tseshaht (pronounced “tsi-sha-aht”), a language once popularly spoken on the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia.

Tseshaht is not the only language Indigenous to Canada that is at risk of disappearing.

Of the 50 Indigenous tongues in Canada, most are in danger of extinction. Globally, the last speaker of a language dies every two weeks. There are at least 2,500 endangered languages and dialects destined for extinction in the next 100 years, according to the UNESCO Atlas of the World’s Languages in Danger.

“This all happened because of residential schools; we’ve almost lost everything,” said Elder Robinson when asked why her language is disappearing. “We’ve pretty well lost our language, except for a few that kept it.”

Elder Robinson said the residential school system played a huge role in diminishing the number of speakers of Native languages because Indigenous children were forced to speak English. Now, Robinson is fighting to keep her Native language alive.


Harper’s disregard for aboriginal health

Published: Aprilá 10, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 10, 2012 - Publication: Globe and Mail

Link http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health/new-health/andre-picard/harpers-disregard-for-aboriginal-health/article2396146/

When governments make a decision that is stupid, embarrassing, overly partisan, or risks causing an outcry, they tend to do so late in the day and late in the week, preferably on the eve of a holiday long weekend, when citizens – and journalists – aren’t paying much attention.

So, late Thursday, the government of Stephen Harper dropped this bombshell, as related in a brief announcement posted on the web site of the National Aboriginal Health Organization: “NAHO funding has been cut by Health Canada. It is with sadness that NAHO will wind down by June 30, 2012.”

The abysmal health status of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples is Canada’s greatest shame.

Taking an ax to an organization that highlights these health issues – and, better still, pursues solutions – is not going to make these problems go away. It is merely going to sweep them under the carpet, where they have been for far too long.

Jack Hicks, an Iqaluit-based suicide researcher summed it up this way: “The Conservatives want out of the aboriginal business.” Who can forget the historic apology proffered by Prime Minister Stephen Harper to survivors of the residential schools? But words are not enough, and a Truth and Reconciliation Commission is not enough.

Concrete actions need to be taken to help the 150,000 Inuit, Métis and First Nations children who were forcibly separated from their families, but action must be taken too in their broader communities, where another million or so aboriginal people, who did not go to residential school, also need help.

The healing process may take generations, true reconciliation even longer. But the ultimate goal must be healthy communities.


History well taught (Letter to the Editor)

Published: Aprilá 09, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 10, 2012 - Publication: Winnipeg Free Press

Link http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/opinion/letters_to_the_editor/have-your-say-146630385.html

Re: Residential schools put in spotlight (April 5). The newest Winnipeg School Division trustee, Mark Wasyliw, is worried Canadians are unaware of aboriginal history and is pushing for the history of the residential schools to be taught at every grade level in Manitoba schools. He also thinks Manitoba should be holding a "Remembrance Day-type assembly" each year to remember the victims of the residential school program.

I'd like to remind Wasyliw that our Conservative federal government has already apologized for the residential school issue and through an ongoing commission has spent billions of dollars compensating aboriginals whose lives were affected by these schools.


Residential schools put in spotlight

Published: Aprilá 05, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 05, 2012 - Publication: Winnipeg Free Press

Link http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/residential-schools-put-in-spotlight-146234415.html

Every school in Winnipeg School Division should hold a "Remembrance Day-type assembly" to recognize the effect of Canada's residential school system, rookie trustee Mark Wasyliw declared Tuesday.

He wants the history of residential schools to be taught at an age-appropriate level in every grade in the division, and he wants Ottawa's formal apology to be framed and posted in every school.

Wasyliw is introducing a motion at the April 16 school board meeting that would be debated and put to a vote May 7.

"I don't know if it's getting taught. Most Canadians don't know it happened," Wasyliw said in an interview. "It's due."


Speaking for Themselves: the Legacy of Residential Schools on Inuit languages in Canada

Published: Aprilá 05, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 05, 2012 - Publication: Capstone Seminar Series, Wordpress

Link http://capstoneseminarseries.wordpress.com/2012/04/04/marianne-williams/

Speaking for Themselves: the Legacy of Residential Schools on Inuit languages in Canada

By Marianne Williams with the collaboration of James Benning

ABSTRACT
This paper examines the historical decline of Inuktitut as a result of the residential school system and the recent resurgence of the language as an act of resistance against assimilation from the Inuit community in Canada. This paper will answer following questions: how did this decline affect the Inuit and what are its residual effects? What are the sources and motivating factors behind the resurgence of Inuktitut? This research is relevant in understanding the role Inuktitut plays within Inuit culture and sovereignty. It also outlines the process of healing and reconciliation through language resurgence.


You can't judge a human book by its cover

Published: Aprilá 05, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 05, 2012 - Publication: Saskatoon Star Phoenix

Link http://www.thestarphoenix.com/judge+human+book+cover/6413868/story.html

It was a day to question your prejudices, as books came alive at the Human Library in downtown Saskatoon.

The Human Library, a first for the city, was held at the Frances Morrison Library March 24. The innovative concept was designed to promote dialogue, reduce prejudices and encourage understanding.

Human books volunteered for the event and allowed themselves to be "checked out" by visitors for up to half an hour. The books told their stories and shared their experiences in a safe environment.

Delvin, an Aboriginal man whose parents were residential school survivors, talked about rising above the challenges and barriers he faced growing up.

Delvin was one of Lynne Lacroix's favourite books. For her, the most moving chapter of his life was when he talked about visiting a healing lodge with his parents and siblings. Delvin's parents said they had made mistakes and asked for his forgiveness. She said his story taught her a lot about her own life.


What's happening This Week

Published: Aprilá 05, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 05, 2012 - Publication: EMC News Ottawa South

Link http://www.emcottawasouth.ca/20120405/news/What's+Happening+This+Week

April 10 - Right Relations With Aboriginal Canadians - Join us at 7:00 PM as we continue our series of learning and discussion on the topic of seeking right relations with Aboriginal Canadians. This time we will discuss the history of the Indian Residential Schools in Canada and the role of the Christian churches, including the United Church of Canada. Emmanuel United Church, 691 Smyth Road. For further info call 613-733-0437.


Abuse victims need sympathy

Published: Aprilá 05, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 05, 2012 - Publication: Saskatoon Star Phoenix

Link http://www.thestarphoenix.com/news/Abuse+victims+need+sympathy/6413760/story.html

On March 30, The Star-Phoenix issued an apology for publishing a letter to the editor that suggested that former NHL hockey star Theoren Fleury should have "walked away" from his former coach and sexual abuser.

Instead of focusing on the victim's trauma, the writer complained about Fleury's coping strategy that included drug and alcohol abuse. The letter was followed by numerous responses from citizens rightly outraged that a member of our community did not understand the complexity of child sexual abuse.

Onerisk factor is victims of child sexual abuse becoming an abusers themselves through learned behaviour. In a meta-analysis published in Child Abuse and Neglect, children who were abused were 236 per cent more likely to become abusers.

This helps to explain the high rate of child sexual abuse among First Nations communities. Among students who were forced to attend residential schools, approximately 50 per cent were victims of child sexual abuse. When these youth became parents, some became abusers.

Let's hope that we have the same sympathy and understanding for all victims of child sexual abuse that we do for former hockey stars. No one deserves to be victimized again.


Preserving a cultural link: Exhibit documents the nearly forgotten Haida language

Published: Aprilá 04, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 04, 2012 - Publication: Vancouver Province

Link http://www.theprovince.com/life/Preserving+cultural+link/6408515/story.html

There is hardly anyone speaking Haida today. Fewer than 40. And of those fluent speakers, most are over the age of 75.

Seeing the urgency of a fast-fading cultural link, Nika Collison and a group of Haida champions got together to document the last remaining speakers through photography and interviews. Seven years later, the result is the exhibit That which Makes us Haida - the Haida Language, which recently opened at the Bill Reid Gallery in Vancouver.

The loss of the Haida language speaks to one of Canada's darkest periods: The residential school system, in which First Nations children were forcibly sent to boarding school and forbidden to speak their language, was largely responsible for the loss of knowledge.


Community Hearings in Saskatchewan

Published: Aprilá 04, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 04, 2012 - Publication: Truth and Reconciliation Commission web site

Link http://www.trc.ca/websites/trcinstitution/index.php?p=3

In preparation for the Saskatoon National Event, the TRC is holding Community Hearings across Saskatchewan.

For more information on the Saskatoon National Event (SNE) and a listing of communities holding Hearings, download the Saskatchewan Regional Hearings Fact Sheet.

Watch the Hearings live via webcast or click the screen to view clips from past Hearings in other communities.

Watch live streaming video from trc_cvr at livestream.com


A 7-Year-Old Aboriginal Girl's Battle to Tell the Truth at School

Published: Aprilá 04, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 04, 2012 - Publication: The Huffington Post

Link http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/chelsea-vowel/residential-schools-canada_b_1385022.html

Ruby was seven years old and in Grade 2. She was to prepare a class presentation on a topic of her choice, and decided she wanted to tell the story of why she doesn't speak her First Nations language.

Ruby wanted to share information about the effects Indian residential school had on her family and community in terms of language loss. This was a very important topic that meant a lot to her. She wanted everyone to know about how wrong Indian residential schools were.

Ruby and her father spoke to Ruby's teacher to describe the intended presentation. The teacher suggested Ruby instead teach the class a few words in her language or about hunting or fishing. Ruby explained once more that she wanted to share the reasons why she doesn't know much of her language. The teacher approved the project.

However, the next day after school the teacher informed Ruby's mother that the topic of Indian Residential Schools was inappropriate. Ruby's parents sat with their seven-year-old daughter and talked about what happened. Ruby usually loved school, but she started saying that she didn't want to go back.

Her school had given her the message that her story is unacceptable and unimportant. That she, because of her culture and how residential schools had had an impact on shaping her life, is unacceptable and unimportant.


The Residential Schools of Canada

Published: Februaryá 28, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 03, 2012 - Publication: James Bay Beacon

Link http://jamesbaybeacon.ca/?q=node/713

Lately the Times-Colonist and the Globe and Mail have been carrying articles about the Residential Schools of Canada, whose sole and stated purpose was to "rid Canada of the Indian problem" by removing the children from their homes and eliminating all traces of their heritage. In a few generations the problem would go away. They used Roman Catholic, Anglican, Presbyterian, and United Church personnel to accomplish this objective.

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission has been on Vancouver Island to listen to the stories of the First Nations. The commission will be in Victoria in mid-April. It has issued an interim report half-way through its mandate. Among its recommendations is a call for greater awareness of what happened in these schools.

First Nations people do not need our pity. Nor can words undo the pain. Only facing the truth can set us all free. First Nations people need us to walk with them as they undertake the long journey back to a renewed sense of the worth of their own culture. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission is a major step in that direction. The recommendations coming out of those hearings will be as critical to every other Canadian as to the First Nations of this land.

Of course, the atrocities are not the full story. We also need to hear stories of the heroism of some of the participants in these schools. Many of the administrators and teachers went out of their way to protect and guide these children. Many of the children reached into their own inner strengths to stand up against what was happening to them. Many of these children learned from their experience to become leaders and good family members. That will never make up for the evils, but it is part of the truth that makes up the history of the Residential Schools of Canada.


Residential schools for natives?

Published: Aprilá 03, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 03, 2012 - Publication: Yahoo! Answers

Link http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20120403012740AAfkD40

QUESTION:

How could this historic even occur without high point drama and trauma?
 
What could of been done to prevent that from happening?
 
Leah
 
ANSWER:
 
We would have needed an entirely different cultural 'mindset' in the day when Residential School programmes were propagated and implemented.
 
spiffer1

First Nations vets pick leader

Published: Aprilá 03, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 03, 2012 - Publication: Saskatoon Star Phoenix

Link http://www.thestarphoenix.com/news/First+Nations+vets+pick+leader/6401046/story.html

The Saskatchewan First Nation Veterans Association has elected a new grand chief.

Raymond Sanderson of the James Smith Cree Nation was elected during an annual general assembly held last week in Saskatoon at the White Buffalo Youth Lodge.

Born on the James Smith Cree Nation, Sanderson entered residential school at the age of seven, where he spent the next 11 years. It was at school that Sanderson became involved with the army cadets like his brother.

During his military career, he was awarded the NATO Special Services Medal, the Saskatchewan Centennial Medal, three NAVA Medals and a thank you medal from Holland. Sanderson has spent the last several years assisting the Saskatchewan First Nations Veterans Association as its Prince Albert branch president.


Ontario Court of Appeal ruling may open door for residential school survivors to claim for compensation

Published: Aprilá 02, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 03, 2012 - Publication: The First Perspective

Link http://www.firstperspective.ca/news/807-ontario-court-of-appeal-ruling-may-open-door-for-residential-school-survivors-to-claim-for-compensation

The Ontario Court of Appeal has denied the request of the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs to freeze the ruling of another court that ruled schools which operated at Stirland Lake and Cristal Lake in Ontario are residential schools for purposes of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement. This could mean that survivors of schools like Teulon in Manitoba where children were removed from their homes to attend a school far away from home could file claims under the Residential Schools Settlement Agreement says Ray Mason, chair of the National Indian Residential Schools Survivor Society.

"This is good news for survivors who attended schools like Teulon, Manitoba which have been previously rejected by Canada as not being a residential school," he said.
The ruling however, has been appealed by the federal government.


Educators should work to put residential school history in the classroom

Published: Aprilá 02, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 02, 2012 - Publication: Windspeaker

Link http://www.ammsa.com/publications/windspeaker/educators-should-work-put-residential-school-history-classroom

The Northwest Territories is taking the lead in educating its students about Indian residential schools. N.W.T. Deputy Premier Jackson Lafferty accepted the historical report They Came for the Children from Truth and Reconciliation Commissioner Marie Wilson and pledged to use it as part of the school curriculum.

“We are proud to be a partner on this very important initiative that’s before us,” said Lafferty on Feb. 24. He also holds the portfolio for education, culture and employment. The N.W.T. committed to taking the lead in educating its students on residential schools when the TRC hosted the second national event in Inuvik last summer.


Shedding her shell

Published: Aprilá 01, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 02, 2012 - Publication: The Sault Star

Link http://www.saultstar.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3521981

Joanna Nahwegahbow’s parents have always stressed upon her the importance of an education.

This was even though father attended residential school and her mom a native day school in Spanish, east of Sault Ste. Marie.

“They saw it as a way for us to have a better life than what they went through,” said Nahwegahbow in a recent interview at her home.

Her paternal grandfather, most of her father’s siblings attended residential school and one of her mom’s siblings lived at Shingwauk in the Sault.

“Indian residential schools are a passion of mine now,” she said, adding that is why she is “so grateful” to be part of the Assembly of First Nations Indian Residential School Survivor Advisory Committee.


WHITE TERROR, CANADA’S INDIAN RESIDENTIAL SCHOOLS AND THE COLONIAL PRESENT: FROM LAW TOWARDS A PEDAGOGY OF RECOGNITION (Doctoral Thesis)

Published: Marchá 30, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 02, 2012 - Publication: University of Toronto web site

Link http://tspace.library.utoronto.ca/bitstream/1807/32328/1/Thielen-Wilson_Leslie_201203_PhD_thesis.pdf

ABSTRACT

What does it mean to say that settler states have a colonial present? In this thesis, I first draw upon the anti-colonial theory of Frantz Fanon (1963, 1967) and contemporary anti-colonial theorists, to understand the nature of colonial power and settler occupation. I develop the theoretical framework of "white terror as colonial force field" structured by the triadic relation of land—terror—white identity, and emphasize that any given site within a colonial force field must be understood as systematically interrelated with other sites, maintained by a settler collectivity. The old European political rationality of "possessive individualism," the historical rationale for not only capitalist accumulation but modern liberal law, government, and sovereignty, is especially useful for tracing interconnections (symbolic and material) among sites within a colonial force field. This ideology functions, in Fanon’s words, to "bring settler and native into being" through processes which dehumanize the latter as property. Marking the Indigenous collective as inherently damaged, reconstitutes the settler collective as legitimate occupiers of land. Next, I provide an illustration of this theoretical framework. I argue that the Canadian government and law’s response to Indigenous peoples’ demand for justice regarding the genocidal violence of Canada’s Indian Residential Schools (IRS) must be read within the context of a contemporary colonial force field.


Truth and reconciliation explored

Published: Aprilá 01, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 02, 2012 - Publication: Vernon Morning Star.com

Link http://www.vernonmorningstar.com/community/145236185.html

A painful chapter in Canadian history will be the focus of an Enderby forum.

The Splatsin First Nation and the Shuswap Inclusion Project will discuss the issue of Indian residential schools and the interim recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Wednesday at 7 p.m. at A.L. Fortune Secondary School.

 “Splatsin band councillor Daniel Joe will speak concerning the residential school experience and its impact on survivors and the First Nations community,” said Bernie Desrosiers, with the Shuswap Inclusion Project.


Local author up for book prize

Published: Februaryá 29, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 02, 2012 - Publication: Chilliwack Times

Link http://www.chilliwacktimes.com/news/Local+author+book+prize/6377535/story.html

Nicola Campbell writes awardwinning children's books that delve into topics hard to unravel for most adults.

But with sparse free-verse poetry, alongside the artwork of Kim LeFave, Campbell is able to sensitively take on the issue of her First Nations background, which for her is tied up with stories of residential school survival.

"The goal of the residential schools was to kill the Indian in the child," she told the Times. "That's an actual quote from their policies; to sever all ties the children had with the parents and grandparents and their culture and identity. So to turn it into a children's book was . . ."

Daunting?

"Ya."


Government needs to get up-front and personal with residential school survivors [editorial]

Published: Aprilá 02, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 02, 2012 - Publication: Windspeaker

Link http://www.ammsa.com/publications/windspeaker/government-needs-get-front-and-personal-residential-school-survivors-editor

It’s more than a little bit disturbing that the Truth and Reconciliation Commission is complaining about the lack of federal involvement in their statement gathering hearings. Does Prime Minister Stephen Harper believe that the 2008 apology for the residential school system is enough to absolve Canada’s Government of its responsibility on this issue? It’s not.

As far as we’re concerned, if the churches that ran these schools can send representatives to bear witness to the survivors’ stories and stand with them in the design of a better future where such atrocities are never allowed to occur again, then a willing partner in this bright future should be Canada.

But now it seems that the same blind eye that allowed pedophiles and vicious brutes to ply their evil in the schools over past decades, remains today. Should there not be some oversight? Should there not be some interest in this process as it unfolds across the country?


Crossing generations with Residential School knowledge

Published: Marchá 29, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 02, 2012 - Publication: Wawatay News Online

Link http://www.wawataynews.ca/archive/all/2012/3/29/crossing-generations-residential-school-knowledge_22594

The Residential School intergenerational workshops hosted by Equay-wuk over the past two months are being lauded a success by organizers and participants alike, even as funding for the one-year program gets set to expire and the future of the workshops remains in doubt.

Equay-wuk’s Residential School workshops brought grandmothers and youth together for two sessions, one in February and one in March. The events were an opportunity for elders to share their stories and experiences from Residential School with youth, while also getting information on settlement payments for the Residential School experience.


Residential school claims assessment

Published: Marchá 28, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 02, 2012 - Publication: CBC Radio One (Quebec AM)

Link http://www.cbc.ca/quebecam/2012/03/28/residential-school-claims-assessments/

The Independent Assessment Process (IAP) for victims of abuse at residential schools is touring Nunavik. Aboriginal people who suffered abuse can meet with representatives to talk about their claim for compensation.

We hear from Peter Rinaldi, director of client services for the Indian Residential Schools Adjudication Secretariat.  (This is the introduction to an audio recording of 8:51 in duration.)


NOTICE TO ALL FORMER STUDENTS WHO ATTENDED AT STIRLAND LAKE (WAHBON BAY ACADEMY) AND/OR CRISTAL LAKE RESIDENTIAL HIGH SCHOOLS (Press Release)

Published: Marchá 28, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 02, 2012 - Publication: Nishnawbe Aski Nation web site

Link http://www.nan.on.ca/article/update-stirland-lake-and-cristal-lake-618.asp

Windigo First Nations Council and Nishnawbe Aski Nation are pleased to announce that Justice Watt, of the Ontario Court of Appeal, ordered on March 27th, 2012, that Canada’s request to temporarily stay (freeze) the terms of the Order of Chief Justice Winkler (in which the Chief Justice declared that Stirland Lake and Cristal Lake are Indian Residential Schools) was denied.

This means that any applications now submitted for the Common Expense Payment (CEP) and/or Independent Assessment Process (IAP) in relation to these two high schools MUST BE PROCESSED by Service Canada and the IAP Secretariat, respectively, notwithstanding the fact that Canada’s appeal from the Chief Justice’s Order has not yet been heard.


Indian Residential Schools Key Milestones

Published: Februaryá 28, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 02, 2012 - Publication: Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada web site

Link http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1332939430258/1332939552554

The Government of Canada began to play a role in the development and administration of Indian Residential Schools in 1874. It operated nearly every school as a joint venture with various religious organizations including Anglican, Presbyterian, United and Roman Catholic churches.

Indian Residential Schools recognized by Canada, and all parties to the Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement (legal counsel for former students, legal counsel for the Churches, the Assembly of First Nations, other Aboriginal organizations), are those where children were placed in a residence for the purposes of education by, or under, the authority of the Government of Canada; and, where the Government of Canada was jointly responsible for the operation of the residence and care of the children resident therein.


Pensionnats indiens Jalons importants

Published: Marchá 28, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 02, 2012 - Publication: Site web des Affaires autochtones et du dÚveloppement du Nord Canada

Link http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/fra/1332939430258/1332939552554

Le gouvernement du Canada a commencé à participer à la mise sur pied et à l'administration des pensionnats indiens en 1874. Le gouvernement du Canada administrait pratiquement toutes les écoles conjointement avec différentes organisations religieuses, notamment les Églises anglicane, presbytérienne, unie et catholique romaine.

Les pensionnats indiens reconnus par le Canada, et par l’ensemble des parties à la Convention de règlement relative aux pensionnats indiens (avocats des anciens élèves, avocats des Églises, Assemblée des Premières Nations et autres organisations autochtones), sont ceux où les enfants étaient placés par le Canada ou en vertu de son autorité à des fins d’éducation et dont le Canada était conjointement responsable de l’administration et des soins aux pensionnaires.


Reconciling to a hard truth

Published: Aprilá 02, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 02, 2012 - Publication: United Church Observer

Link http://www.ucobserver.org/features/2012/04/reconciling_hard_truth/

Anne Thrasher is a 56-year-old Inuvialuit woman from Paulatuk, a remote community of just over 300 in the western Arctic. When Thrasher was a child, her father worked on the DEW Line, the network of radar outposts built in the far North during the Cold War to detect incoming Soviet aircraft. There were no schools at the outposts, so at the age of five, she was shipped off to the Grollier Hall residential school in Inuvik, N.W.T. She stayed at the Catholic-run school for 10 years.

Thrasher says she was abused at Grollier Hall in ways that she still finds too painful to speak about publicly. Unlike thousands of other residential school survivors, she never considered suing for damages. “I had been doing well putting it behind me,” she says. Even after the creation of a new process that makes it possible for survivors to seek compensation without having to resort to lawsuits or other adversarial legal measures, she resisted the opportunity to make a claim. “I had my trust broken by the residential schools and by the Canadian government already,” Thrasher says. “How was I supposed to put my trust in the process?”

Eventually, word-of-mouth reports from other Paulatuk residents saying the new process was confidential and fair brought Thrasher around. She called a lawyer in Kamloops, B.C., and set the wheels in motion to tell her story to the Independent Assessment Process (IAP) set up as part of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement reached in 2005 by the federal government, the Assembly of First Nations and the Canadian churches that ran residential schools.

At the time it was signed, there was great hope that the agreement would finally bring closure to an awful chapter in Canada’s history. But events have taken an unexpected turn, and closure is still far off. The IAP, in particular, has opened a floodgate of new claims from people like Anne Thrasher, suggesting that the number of children who were abused in residential schools was much greater than anyone imagined. If reconciliation must be founded on truth, here is an emerging hard truth that must be explored.


ObserverDocs: Reconciling to a hard truth

Published: Aprilá 02, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 02, 2012 - Publication: United Church Observer

Link http://www.ucobserver.org/video/2012/03/hard_truth/

A historic settlement agreement promised closure for residential school survivors. But no one thought it would open the floodgates to thousands of new abuse claims.  (Introduction to a video of 5:22 in duration.)


Metis National Council calls for reconciliation for Metis residential school students

Published: Aprilá 02, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 02, 2012 - Publication: APTN National News

Link http://aptn.ca/pages/news/2012/04/02/metis-national-council-calls-for-reconciliation-for-metis-residential-school-students/

The Metis National Council is meeting in Saskatoon to discuss issues surrounding the Metis experience in residential schools and how to push for official reconciliation.

Thousands of Metis children attended residential schools, but were not included in the official 2008 apology from the Canadian federal government.

APTN National News reporter Delaney Windigo has the details.  (Introduction to a video of 2:49 in duration.)


Residential schools commission to visit Beaufort Delta

Published: Marchá 29, 2012 - Added: Aprilá 02, 2012 - Publication: CBC.ca (North)

Link http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/story/2012/03/29/north-trc-beaufort-delta.html

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission will travel to Inuvialuit communities in the Beaufort Delta region of the N.W.T. next month.