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Dans les médias

Dans les médias - archives: 2012-01


Cette page contient une liste , ainsi qu'un sommaire, d'articles au sujets ayant trait aux pensionnats indiens, le PEI et autres sujets connexes.

Veuilliez suivre les liens inclus avec chaque article afin de trouver le texte complet.

Il est possible que les aricles qui suivent ne soient pas disponibles dans la langue officielle de votre choix car ils proviennent de sources externes au secrétariat.

Articles

The Harper 'apology': Residential schools and Bill C-10

Publié: 30 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 31 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Woodstock Sentinel Review

Lien http://www.woodstocksentinelreview.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3453865

Actions that have followed (the Residential Schools Apology) suggest the Harper government's policy direction contradicts the spirit of the apology and moves us backward.

One such example is Bill C-10, the Crime Omnibus Bill.

While Bill C-10 does not explicitly target Aboriginal people, the implications for Aboriginal people cannot be ignored.

It has long been understood that there is a strong association between severe poverty and crime. The government of Canada's own website states that "Social and economic disadvantage has been found to be strongly associated with crime."

The rate of poverty for Aboriginal people in Canada far exceeds the rate for non-Aboriginal people.

This accounts for the fact that 18% of people in Canada's jails are Aboriginal, despite being only 3% of the total population (Stats Canada, 2006 Census).


Prince Albert to hear residential school stories at hearings

Publié: 30 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 31 Janvier 2012 - Publication: News talk 650 CKOM

Lien http://www.newstalk650.com/story/prince-albert-hear-residential-school-stories-hearings/41662

Prince Albert to hear residential school stories at hearings.
 
Truth and Reconciliation Commission hearings to be held over three days
 
Three days have been set aside at the Indian and Metis Friendship Centre to hear the stories of those in the Prince Albert area. People who wish to share their stories can sign up in the morning at 8:30.

Hearings have already been held in Regina and Key First Nation.

Each day is scheduled to wrap around 4 p.m. But Linda Osoup at the Friendship Centre says the time is very flexible.

Twelve communities will hold hearings leading up to the national event in Saskatoon in June.


Independent Assessment Process for Abuse Victims - DEADLINE TO FILE IAP CLAIMS: SEPTEMBER 19, 2012

Publié: 24 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 30 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Sack Goldblatt Mitchell LLP web site

Lien http://www.sgmlaw.com/en/practiceareas/ResidentialSchoolsIAP.cfm

The Class Action Settlement of the Residential Schools Class Action established an Independent Assessment Process (IAP) as an out of court, alternative dispute resolution process to resolves claims of abuse suffered at Indian Residential Schools. First Nations people who suffered abuse at Indian Residential Schools in Canada must make their IAP claims by September 19, 2012.

You can hire a lawyer to assist and represent you in your IAP claim. We are offering our legal services if you need legal help. Suzanne Desrosiers and Fay Brunning are lawyers who have formed a legal team to assist you. Our team also includes an articling student, Christine Hodgins, and a paralegal, Christina Ruest.


Attawapiskat: Lots of love, and rocks, for a young generation

Publié: 29 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 30 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Toronto Star

Lien http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/article/1123353--attawapiskat-lots-of-love-and-rocks-for-a-young-generation

In Attawapiskat, the pain of the residential schools echoes down generations. Most who survived them — Micheline Okimaw, for one — are willing to talk about almost anything else. When residential schools come up, eyes usually go to another place and there is a variation on the phrase “but that’s another story.”

Angie Lafontaine said that when children are taken from their homes, “you are attacking the heart of the people ... The first duty is to protect our children, and when you can’t do it, there is a breaking of that fundamental connection between parents and children and there’s despair.

“A lot of people have said that they can’t even express love, that they’ve been so damaged they don’t even know how to love.”

Lafontaine calls it “ethno-stress,” the impact on a people at a “deep psychological, emotional and spiritual level.”

As a result, there is a lot of pain in First Nations communities, she said. “And that pain comes out through addictions” and deplorable suicide rates.


A project for our spirits - Couple hopes to blend native spirituality and art to tell their community's story in the stained glass windows of Attawapiskat's Catholic Church.

Publié: 28 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 30 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Ottawa Citizen (Postmedia News)

Lien http://www.ottawacitizen.com/project+spirits/6065210/story.html

It's a project dedicated to creating beauty and sunlit colour in a community that could badly use some, a project that was in the works long before headlines and television news showed families in Attawapiskat living in one-room shacks without electricity or running water.

As the federal government works on solving the crisis, a couple from the community is in Ottawa, quietly working on a different dream: creating jewel-coloured stained glass windows to grace Attawapiskat's Catholic Church, and remind people that the community is also home to beauty and artistic talent.

With help from a $50,000 grant from the federal Truth and Reconciliation fund, the couple arranged to travel to Ottawa for the crash course in glass-making.


Sugar Falls: A Residential School Story

Publié: 27 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 30 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Canada's History.ca

Lien http://canadashistory.ca/Education/Young-Historians/-hi-story-telling/January-2012/-Sugar-Falls--A-Residential-School-Story-.aspx

Last night, I attended the book launch of Sugar Falls: A Residential School Story, a graphic novel by David Robertson and illustrated by Scott Henderson.

Sugar Falls tells the true story of Betty Ross, an Elder from Cross Lake First Nation who is a residential school survivor. Betty’s story is remarkable and at the same time far too common of Aboriginal children forced into the residential school system. At the age of 4 or 5, Betty was thrown out by her own mother (herself a victim of residential schools) in the middle of winter. Betty managed to find shelter under an overturned canoe, until a man came along and found her. She found peace with her new adoptive family, until she was once again uprooted and put into a residential school.


8th Fire: Waub Rice on the sad history of residential schools

Publié: 26 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 30 Janvier 2012 - Publication: CBC

Lien http://www.cbc.ca/books/2012/01/8th-fire-waub-rice-on-the-sad-history-of-removal.html

To further explore Aboriginal history and culture through a literary perspective, CBC Books has teamed up with journalist and fiction writer Waubgeshig Rice, author of Midnight Sweatlodge, to present a series of blog posts highlighting the important work of Indigenous writers, past, present and future.

In his third post, Rice discusses authors who have examined the history of residential schools and their own personal experiences with them.
 


Truth and Reconciliation in P.A.

Publié: 30 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 30 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Prince Albert Daily Herald

Lien http://www.paherald.sk.ca/Local/News/2012-01-30/article-2879555/Truth-and-Reconciliation-in-P.A./1

The truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) is coming to Prince Albert this week. From Jan. 31 to Feb. 2, hearings will be held at the Prince Albert Indian and Métis Friendship Centre. 

The hearing in Prince Albert is one of 12, which are being held across the province, in preparation for that event.

Hearings are happening on a variety of different dates in many regions across Saskatchewan from Jan. 16 to June 7. They began in Regina and will finish up in La Ronge.


Corrections staff to be trained to deal with aboriginal offenders

Publié: 26 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 27 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Vancouver Sun (Postmedia News)

Lien http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Corrections+staff+trained+deal+with+aboriginal+offenders/6058021/story.html

The Correctional Service of Canada is developing a national training program to ensure staff are adhering to principles set out in a landmark Supreme Court of Canada ruling in 1999 that called over-representation of aboriginals in the justice system a "crisis."

In R v Gladue, the Supreme Court recognized that certain mitigating factors — including aboriginal peoples' history of dislocation, disadvantage and discrimination — and a range of options should be considered when sentencing them.

A background sheet attached to the call for bids noted that the circumstances of crimes committed by aboriginal offenders are "often related to substance abuse, inter-generational abuse, residential schools, family issues and low levels of education, employment and income."


Commemoration Initiative Call for Proposals - 2012

Publié: 27 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 27 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Truth and Reconciliation Commission web site

Lien http://www.myrobust.com/websites/trcinstitution/index.php?p=562

The goal of the Commemoration Initiative is to honour, educate, remember, memorialize and/or pay tribute to residential school former students, their families and their communities. It also acknowledges their experiences and the broad and systemic impacts of the residential school system.

Commemoration initiatives may involve the creation of, or improvements to existing, permanent memorials and commemorative structures, or ceremonies or other projects.

Applications will be accepted until 4 p.m. CT on March 30, 2012.


Initiative de commémoration - 2012

Publié: 27 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 27 Janvier 2012 - Publication: TRC

Lien http://www.trc.ca/websites/trcinstitution/index.php?p=113

Le but de l'initiative de commémoration est de reconnaître et faire connaître les torts qu’ont subis les anciens élèves des pensionnats, leurs familles et leurs communautés, faire la lumière sur les conséquences systémiques du régime de pensionnats et rendre hommage aux victimes. Les initiatives de commémoration peuvent comprendre l’érection de monuments ou de structures commémoratives permanentes ou la restauration de ceux qui sont en place, la tenue de cérémonies ou d’autres projets.

Au total, 20 millions de dollars seront affectés aux initiatives de commémoration. Environ 11 millions de dollars seront alloués par suite de l’appel de propositions de 2012. 

Les propositions seront acceptées au plus tard à 16 h (HC), le 30 mars 2012.


Residential Schools in Canada

Publié: 23 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 27 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Blog at Wordpress.com

Lien http://cansp.wordpress.com/2012/01/23/residential-schools-in-canada/

Has Canada been implicated in genocide? 

A revival of this subject has occurred in popular media in recent years due to the government and churches’ public quasi-apologies, survivor lawsuits, and legal and monetary settlements.  Indeed, residential schools have become a representation of the nation-state’s intervention into Aboriginal families and communities, as well as the ability to dictate assimilation and the abuse of the churches’ trust responsibility (Million, 2000). 

Despite this fact, the true breadth and complexity of the impact of residential schools remains under-studied by academics, and recent perspectives brought to light have only emphasized the silence and ignorance surrounding this issue.  Is there truth to the hype, or evidence that the accusations are founded – was this in fact a form of genocide, hidden from the public eye?  Do assimilation or acculturation in any way justify the actions taken by the churches on behalf of the Canadian government?

Conclusion

There is very little evidence that residential schooling was a result of misplaced enthusiasm for the missionary imperative or to provide aid to a population in need of education.  Instead, the aims and purposes of specialized institutions to assimilate Native children into the “more civilized” European image resulted in a distancing of family and culture that led to generations of trauma, poor self-concept, and non-adaptive behaviour in the forms of mistrust, cultural conflict, and substance abuse.


Winnipeg author examines residential school experience through graphic novel

Publié: 26 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 27 Janvier 2012 - Publication: CBC

Lien http://www.cbc.ca/manitoba/scene/books/2012/01/26/winnipeg-author-examines-residential-school-experience-through-graphic-novel/#igImgId_28811

It doesn't seem too long ago that I was in the round room at elder Betty Ross's work listening to her describe her residential school experience. It was the first time she had ever told her story.

As I sat with Betty, my task became clear as each word escaped her lips. I needed to tell her story. Her experience encapsulated every aspect of the schools I wanted to tackle: she was taken to Cross Lake Residential School as a young girl without any say in the matter, her adopted parents without one either; she was abused in horrific ways; she was kept from seeing her parents in any significant way; she was punished for speaking her language; and there were times where the pain and the indignity were too much.


Share Your Truth: TRC Inuit Sub-Commission Announces Community Hearings on Baffin Island, Nunavut

Publié: 26 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 26 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Truth and Reconciliation Commission web site

Lien http://www.myrobust.com/websites/trcinstitution/File/pdfs/Baffin%20Island_Hearings_Announcement_2012-01-25.pdf

The Inuit Sub-Commission of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada announced today that Co-Directors, Jennifer Hunt-Poitras and Robert Watt are gearing up to begin extensive travel into Inuit Communities on Baffin Island to record statements.

The upcoming community hearings will take place in Pond Inlet, Clyde River, Pangnirtung and Qikiqtarjuaq from February 7-16, 2012.


Conservatives improving lives of first nations people

Publié: 26 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 26 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Vancouver Sun

Lien http://www.vancouversun.com/opinion/Conservatives+improving+lives+first+nations+people/6054328/story.html

Re: Harper should revisit 2006 Kelowna Accord, says ex-PM Martin, Jan. 23

The Liberals consider the Kelowna Accord to be a "cure" for the complex issues facing first nations; however, history has shown that such grand declarations do not address fundamental issues.

That is why our Conservative government is working with first nations and other key partners to develop practical solutions and make targeted investments to deliver concrete results.

Since 2006, we have delivered a statement of apology to former residential school students, signed five education tripartites, developed a Joint Action Plan with the Assembly of First Nations, and jointly launched a National Panel on Education.


Thunder Bay Circle: Arrest the Legacy: from residential schools to prisons dialogue

Publié: 26 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 26 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Native Women's Association of Canada web site

Lien http://www.nwac.ca/fr/node/1024

Arrest the Legacy: from residential schools to prisons dialogue

Thunder Bay, ON Feb 1-3, 2012

 This is the third such circle NWAC has held across the country.  The Thunder Bay circle will be held in partnership with the Ontario Native Women’s Association.  These circles aim to promote greater futures and opportunities for Aboriginal women and girls who are direct or intergenerational survivors of Indian Residential Schools and in conflict with the law.  A longer term goal is to ensure professionals in fields linked to mainstream, restorative, and Traditional justice increase their knowledge and ability to respond in culturally relevant and gender sensitive ways to criminalized/incarcerated Aboriginal women and girls. 


Manitoba lawyer investigated for fee irregularities in residential school cases

Publié: 25 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 26 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Legal Feeds: The Blog of Canadian Lawyer & Law Times

Lien http://www.canadianlawyermag.com/legalfeeds/668/Manitoba-lawyer-investigated-for-fee-irregularities-in-residential-school-cases.html

A Winnipeg lawyer has been suspended by the Law Society of Manitoba until he can face a hearing on allegations that he took more money in fees from residential school survivors than he was entitled to.

Howard Tennenhouse, who had well over 100 former residential school clients, was suspended on Jan. 11. The allegations relate to around 50 clients.
 


Indian Residential Schools in Canada the painful legacy

Publié: 26 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 26 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Kids Boarding School

Lien http://kidsboardingschool.com/indian-residential-schools-in-canada-the-painful-legacy

Canada’s Indian Residential School system was responsible for the loss of culture and self-identity for hundreds of thousands of Aboriginal children. Recently, the government has made an apology to former students and the First Nations, in general, for the policy that was the root cause of many of the problems in aboriginal communities and with individuals, today. As well, legal cases – both individual as well as class-action — have gone forward against individuals for physical, mental and sexual abuse perpetrated by staff at these schools. …(Written Introduction for a YouTube video of 12:02 in duration.)


Is it Nothing to You? Another Hero Falls

Publié: 25 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 26 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Promote Liberty

Lien http://promoteliberty.wordpress.com/2012/01/25/is-it-nothing-to-you-another-hero-falls-by-kevin-annett/

Ricky Lavallie is dead.

He was a 51 year old native man, and was the sole witness to the murder by three Vancouver policemen of another key aboriginal activist in our network, Johnny Bingo Dawson.

The sudden death of Ricky Lavallie on January 3 has wiped out the last of my original core supporters among urban native people in Vancouver and Winnipeg. Our original nucleus of the Friends and Relatives of the Disappeared(FRD) has been extinguished.

These witnesses, and the dead native leaders of our FRD, were instrumental in publicly naming the churches and government of Canada as being guilty of crimes against humanity. And they have all paid the ultimate price for doing so.

I charge these religious and state organizations with their murders.


Legal setback for Ontario aboriginals taken from their families during the “Sixties Scoop”

Publié: 25 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 26 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Toronto Star

Lien http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/politics/article/1121500--legal-setback-for-ontario-aboriginals-taken-from-their-families-during-the-sixties-scoop

The federal government has won its appeal in Divisional Court against a class-action lawsuit on behalf of 16,000 aboriginal children taken from reserves in Ontario in what’s known as the “Sixties Scoop.”

The decision is seen as a major setback for aboriginal plaintiffs, now adults, who allege Ottawa stripped them of their cultural identity by sending them off as children to non-aboriginal homes. Many told stories of abuse, alienation and isolation in foster and adoptive homes in Canada and the U.S.


Déclaration du Premier ministre du Canada à l'occasion du rassemblement de la Couronne et des Premières Nations

Publié: 24 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 25 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Site web du Premier ministre du Canada

Lien http://pm.gc.ca/fra/media.asp?category=3&featureId=6&pageId=26&id=4597

« Bienvenue, mesdames et messieurs, c’est vraiment un plaisir de tous vous accueillir ici sur le territoire ancestral des Algonquins, à ce rassemblement historique de la Couronne et des Premières Nations.

« Notre gouvernement a travaillé fort pour régler des questions qui préoccupent depuis longtemps les membres des Premières Nations du Canada. Et je crois que compte tenu du travail que nous avons accompli ensemble jusqu’à maintenant, nous avons une chance en or de renforcer nos relations et d’offrir des opportunités économiques aux Canadiens et aux Canadiennes d’origine autochtone.

« Cela dit, nous devons aussi reconnaître qu’il y a eu des moments moins réjouissants, des moments très difficiles. En réalité, pour des générations, la relation entre nos peuples a été assombrie. Elle a été assombrie, en particulier, par le fait que des enfants autochtones ont été forcés de fréquenter des pensionnats, une tentative explicite de destruction et de démantèlement de la famille autochtone, qui a blessé si profondément tant de gens.

« C’est pourquoi le jour où je me suis levé à la Chambre des communes pour présenter des excuses aux anciens élèves des pensionnats a été pour moi l’un des plus émouvants de mon mandat. Nous avons reconnu ce triste chapitre de notre histoire. Nous avons répudié le raisonnement qui se trouvait derrière cette période qui a blessé beaucoup de gens, profondément. Et nous sommes allés au-delà du geste symbolique; nous avons agi concrètement pour dédommager les victimes. »


Statement by the Prime Minister of Canada at the Crown-First Nations Gathering

Publié: 24 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 25 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Prime Minister of Canada Web Site

Lien http://pm.gc.ca/eng/media.asp?category=3&featureId=6&pageId=26&id=4597

Welcome, Ladies and Gentlemen, it is indeed a pleasure to welcome you on the traditional territory of the Algonquin, to this historic Crown-First Nations Gathering. 

Our Government has worked hard to deal with matters of abiding concern to members of Canada’s First Nations.  And I believe that, as a consequence of our work together thus far, we have exciting opportunities to strengthen our relationships.

Nonetheless, we must acknowledge the not-so-uplifting moments, some very low points and the reality that, for generations,  the relationship between our peoples was tainted, tainted in a manner that eroded trust and blocked ways forward as does a tree fallen across a road.  Tainted in particular by the experience of the forced residential schools, the explicit attempt to destroy aboriginal culture and to dismantle the aboriginal family that wounded so many so deeply.

“That is why one of my most rewarding days in office was when I rose in the House to deliver an apology to those students.  We acknowledged that sad chapter in our history.  We repudiated the thinking that lay behind it.  And, we went beyond symbolism; we took concrete action to settle the claims of those who had been injured.


Government of Canada Progress Report (2006 - 2012) - With Strong Resolve: Advancing our Relationship with First Nations Peoples and Communities

Publié: 24 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 25 Janvier 2012 - Publication: AANDC

Lien http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1327173357543

The Government of Canada is committed to empowering Aboriginal people and communities, to building a new relationship based on reconciliation and healing for past injustices, and to strengthening Aboriginal governance and self-government. The 2008 Statement of Apology to former students of Indian Residential Schools remains a touchstone towards building this new relationship.

The Government of Canada remains committed to the timely implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement and working with the Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission to ensure that it fulfills its very important mandate.

Budget 2010 committed an additional $199 million over two years to the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement to ensure that necessary mental health and emotional support services continue to be provided to former students and their families, and that payments to former students are made in a timely and effective manner. These additional funds included $65.9 million over two years for Health Canada's Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Support Program.


Rapport d'étape du gouvernement du Canada (2006-2012) - Avec détermination : Renforcer les relations avec les membres et les collectivités des Premières Nations du Canada

Publié: 24 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 25 Janvier 2012 - Publication: AANDC

Lien http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/fra/1327173357543/1327173403786

Réconciliation, gouvernance et autonomie gouvernementale

Le gouvernement du Canada demeure résolu à aider les Autochtones et les collectivités autochtones à s'assumer, et tient à cultiver une nouvelle relation fondée sur la réconciliation et la guérison relativement aux injustices du passé et à renforcer la gouvernance et l'autonomie gouvernementale des Autochtones. La présentation d'excuses aux anciens élèves des pensionnats indiens, en 2008, est un geste important pour l'établissement de cette nouvelle relation.

Le gouvernement du Canada s'engage toujours à mettre rapidement en œuvre la Convention de règlement relative aux pensionnats indiens et à travailler en collaboration avec la Commission de vérité et de réconciliation relative aux pensionnats indiens pour veiller à ce que la Convention remplisse son très important mandat.

Dans le cadre du budget de 2010, le gouvernement a offert un montant supplémentaire de 199 millions de dollars sur deux ans à la Convention de règlement relative aux pensionnats indiens pour veiller à ce que les services de santé mentale et de soins affectifs nécessaires soient toujours offerts aux anciens élèves et à leur famille et à ce que les paiements aux anciens élèves soient versés rapidement et efficacement. Ce financement supplémentaire comprend 65,9 millions de dollars sur deux ans pour le Programme de soutien en santé – résolution des questions des pensionnats indiens de Santé Canada.


The Harper 'apology': Residential schools and Bill C-10

Publié: 24 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 25 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives web site

Lien http://www.policyfix.ca/2012/01/harper-apology-residential-schools-and.html

In 2008, Prime Minister Stephen Harper publicly apologized for Canada’s role in the “aggressive assimilation” of Aboriginal children through the government-supported, church-run residential schools.

The hope was that change would follow, and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission was seen to be a first step in the process of healing and moving forward. However, actions that have followed suggest the Harper government’s policy direction contradicts the spirit of the apology and moves us backward.

One such example is Bill C-10, the Crime Omnibus Bill.

On September 20, 2011, a few months after winning a majority election, Stephen Harper’s Justice Minister, Rob Nicholson, tabled Bill C-10, an omnibus bill titled the Safe Streets and Communities Act. The Bill combined nine separate bills that had failed to pass in previous sessions of parliament. The Canadian Civil Liberties Association (CCLA) says that Bill C-10 will “fundamentally change every component of Canada’s criminal justice system”.

The Harper apology did not wipe away the damage done by residential schools and colonization generally, and policies like Bill C-10 will only serve to perpetuate the damage. What is needed, in keeping with the residential school apology, is a commitment to a new policy direction aimed at supporting Aboriginal people in raising themselves out of poverty. This must include investment in the long-term healing of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people through decolonization and cultural reclamation, together with increased and longer term investment in literacy, education and training, housing and job creation.


No passion, no concrete gains: Nepinak (Sub-item: Words of gratitude)

Publié: 25 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 25 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Winnipeg Free Press

Lien http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/no-passion-no-concrete-gains-nepinak-138026743.html

MANITOBA Keewatinowi Okimakanak Grand Chief David Harper delivered a message to the prime minister from his mother regarding the 2008 federal government apology for residential schools.

"Personally I had to deliver a personal message to the prime minister that my mother accepted the apology. I was able to say that and he heard those words," said Harper.

Chief Harper also brought with him a beaver pelt elders in his home community of Garden Hill prepared as a reminder of the government's treaty obligations.

"On that beaver pelt it was written 'As long as the sun shines, the grass grows and the rivers flow, this is the true intent of our treaties.' "


Attawapiskat artists get crash course in stained glass

Publié: 24 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 25 Janvier 2012 - Publication: CBC

Lien http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/story/2012/01/24/ottawa-attawapiskat-stained-glass-project.html

Two artists from the Attawapiskat First Nation are taking a crash course in stained glass in Ottawa as part of a special project they hope will help their community heal.

Jackie Hookimaw-Witt and her husband Norbert Witt are working with Northern Art Glass in Ottawa on a week-long course as part of a project to replace six large stained glass windows for the Catholic church in Attawapiskat.

Hookimaw-Witt's project is connected to older wounds, including the church's history of removing children from the community to residential schools.

She applied and received a $50,000 grant from the federal Truth and Reconciliation Fund to create the stained glass windows.


The Hon. Frank Iacobucci, retired justice of the Supreme Court of Canada, will speak about the legacy of Indian Residential Schools at Suffolk University Law School on Thursday, Jan. 19, 2012.

Publié: 23 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 24 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Press Release of the Suffolk University Law School

Lien http://presszoom.com/story_171317.html

The Hon. Frank Iacobucci, retired justice of the Supreme Court of Canada, will speak about the legacy of Indian Residential Schools at Suffolk University Law School on Thursday, Jan. 19, 2012.
 


Three aboriginals who are already making a difference

Publié: 24 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 24 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Winnipeg Free Press (Postmedia News)

Lien http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/canada/three-aboriginals-who-are-already-making-a-difference-137946403.html

Many aboriginals across the country aren't waiting for the federal government to intervene -- they're taking concrete steps to force change in their communities and in Canada. Here are three Manitobans who are making a difference.

Phil Fontaine, former national chief of the Assembly of First Nations (1997-2000, 2003-09)

Fontaine, himself a survivor of Canada's residential school system, was instrumental in negotiating the $5.1-billion residential-school settlement, which included compensation for survivors, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, an education fund, healing resources and commemoration funding.

Justice Murray Sinclair, chairman of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission

Sinclair has been criss-crossing the country, hearing testimony from residential school survivors and others affected by the legacy of the government-sponsored schools, where 150,000 aboriginal children spent time after being taken from their homes. He has spoken publicly about the need to bring out the truth about the schools, which for 150 years operated on a government mandate to "kill the Indian in the child," in the famous words of Duncan Campbell Scott, the head of the Department of Indian Affairs from 1913 to 1932.

Wab Kinew, musician, TV/Radio host, CBC

Kinew is the host of CBC's The 8th Fire, a four-part miniseries about aboriginal-Canadian relations, which sheds light on our shared history with an aim to moving forward together.

Kinew's approach is light, but straight -- the show doesn't pull punches and lets facts speak for themselves. It dispels the myth First Nations people don't pay any taxes, teaches Canadians about the Indian Act and discusses the far-reaching impact of residential schools.


Former Canadian Supreme Court Justice to Speak at Suffolk Law

Publié: 23 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 23 Janvier 2012 - Publication: PressZoom

Lien http://presszoom.com/story_171317.html

The Hon. Frank Iacobucci, retired justice of the Supreme Court of Canada, will speak about the legacy of Indian Residential Schools at Suffolk University Law School on Thursday, Jan. 19, 2012.

Justice Iacobucci’s lecture was planned by Suffolk Law’s Indian Law and Indigenous Peoples Clinic, which primarily serves the needs of tribal governments and individual Native Americans in the six New England states.


Canadian Bishops Add Aboriginal Web Page to Site

Publié: 22 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 23 Janvier 2012 - Publication: ICTMN

Lien http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2012/01/22/canadian-bishops-add-aboriginal-web-page-to-site-73694

The Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops (CCCB) is devoting a new section on its site, Catholic Church and Indigenous Peoples in Canada, the group announced on January 13.

 


NTI mounts legal action to expand list of residential schools

Publié: 20 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 23 Janvier 2012 - Publication: NUNATSIAQ NEWS

Lien http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674nti_mounts_legal_action_to_expand_list_of_residential_schools/

NTI is collecting the names of former students to prepare for legal action, when the organization hopes to have Kivalliq Hall added to the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement’s list of schools.

Kivalliq Hall is currently not on the list of schools recognized under the federal settlement agreement.

In some cases, Inuit applicants have been denied compensation because it’s unclear whether or not the federal government had the sole responsibility over the particular school they attended.


CCCB & Canada’s Indigenous Peoples

Publié: 14 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 20 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Salt and Light TV

Lien http://saltandlighttv.org/blog/tag/residential-schools

The Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops has dedicated a new page on its website to the Church and Indigenous Peoples of Canada.

Their page will host various sections that detail the history of the Church and Canada’s indigenous peoples. More than that, clergy and faithful alike will find a CCCB art collection, official texts from the Vatican, information on Indian residential schools and Blessed Kateri Tekakwitha, who will soon be canonized as North America’s first aboriginal saint.


TRC lands in Saskatchewan to hear residential school stories

Publié: 17 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 20 Janvier 2012 - Publication: APTN

Lien http://aptn.ca/pages/news/2012/01/17/trc-lands-in-saskatchewan-to-hear-residential-school-stories/

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission is making its first major stop in Saskatchewan this week.

Saskatchewan’s survivors of residential schools are being invited to share their stories and mingle with representatives of organizations who support the healing process.

As APTN National News reporter Larrisa Burnouf tells us, not everyone is ready to forgive.  (A video of 3:37 in duration follows.)


Opposition is spinning native misfortune for partisan gain

Publié: 19 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 19 Janvier 2012 - Publication: National Post

Lien http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2012/01/19/chuck-strahl-opposition-is-spinning-native-misfortune-for-partisan-gain/

In 2007, when I was minister of Indian and Northern Affairs, a story broke that the department had “misappropriated” $82-million intended for survivors of residential schools. Worse yet, the story suggested, this money (known as the Common Experience Payment) was earmarked for elderly survivors. The minister and his minions had taken funds designated for the most vulnerable members of aboriginal society. “This is a travesty on a monumental scale if the Conservatives think they can use the Indian residential schools trust fund as a kitty to dip into for purposes completely unrelated,” declared New Democrat MP Pat Martin.

We scrambled in my office, trying to find the source of the story, only to discover that the opposition had simply misread the financial statements: The money had not only been set aside for survivors as promised, but we had paid it out early to elderly First Nations people so they would be amongst the first to receive the funds. The opposition had simply looked up the wrong numbers in the wrong year.

I described the situation to the House of Commons that same day, publicly explaining that we had not taken away any funds, and had actually been able to accelerate the payments. Unfortunately, the damage already was done. Even though media outlets and opposition politicians were either given or offered briefings on how to read the financial documents, some of them kept referring to the alleged “misappropriation,” and to the allegedly callous attitude of the staff at Indian Affairs. Some media outlets ran with the story even after the facts were made clear to them. The genie was out of the bottle.


Residential Schools Settlement Update for January 18, 2012

Publié: 18 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 19 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Nation Talk.ca

Lien http://www.nationtalk.ca/modules/news/article.php?storyid=50329

Update for January 18, 2012:

The Indian Residential Schools Adjudication Secretariat has posted updated statistics including details such as the amount of claims received and total compensation distributed from September 19, 2007 to January 1, 2012:

Total number of claims received as of January 1, 2012:
24,708

Total number of claims In Progress:
10,848

Total number of claims Withdrawn and/or Ineligible:
2,355

Total number of ADR/IAP Settled and Decisions Rendered:
11,505

Total Compensation as of January 1, 2012:
$1,309,590,816

The update can be viewed at www.iap-pei.ca.

The next status update will be available on January 25, 2012.


Returning To Spirit (Residential School Reconciliation Program) Whose responsibility is it for the residential schools? Everyone’s! Non Aboriginal and Aboriginal Workshops

Publié: 18 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 19 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Caledonia Courier

Lien http://www.caledoniacourier.com/opinion/137436248.html

My husband Murray and I attended the five day non aboriginal ‘intensive’ workshop, November 28th to December 3rd, in Prince George at the Domano Renewal Center, that a trusted and respected acquaintance of mine gently referred us to. This healing workshop has proven to have enhanced all my relations, personal, professional and in the community. On a more personal note it has made a profound difference in my marriage as we learned through the workshop how to speak the same language, take responsibility for our own lives and, should there be a breakdown, how to breakthrough quickly instead of repeating the same unhealthy patterns in which we were stuck. “You learn a whole new dialogue,” to quote the workshop.  I have been to many workshops, models of healing, and therapies and all I can say is this one is extremely unique, highly emotionally intense and positively one I feel compelled to share. I am aware of some others in the community who have been and also say the same about the Returning To Spirit Workshop. Here in Fort St James the contact person is Elder Holistic Healer Margo Sagalon.


Morning News - Residential Schools

Publié: 18 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 19 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Global

Lien http://www.globalregina.com/video/residential+schools/video.html?v=2188222096#interviews/video

Scott Mclean sits down with Cadmus Delorne President of Students at First Nations University.  (Introduction to a video of 4:09 in duration).


La Commission de vérité et réconciliation est de passage à Regina

Publié: 16 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 18 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Radio-Canada.ca (Saskatchewan)

Lien http://www.radio-canada.ca/regions/saskatchewan/2012/01/16/004-verite-reconciliation-regina.shtml

La Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada est de passage à l'Université des Premières Nations de Regina, pour trois jours cette semaine. Lundi, les commissaires ont écouté les premières histoires des survivants des pensionnats autochtones de la province.

Beaucoup ont avoué avoir subi des agressions et se rappellent de la pression exercée contre eux pour qu'ils tournent le dos à leur culture et leur langue. D'autres survivants ont souligné à quel point il est important pour eux de partager leur histoire dans le but de sensibiliser le public. Dans la salle, une centaine de personnes écoutaient leurs témoignages avec beaucoup d'émotion.


Truth and Reconciliation Commission hearing underway in Regina

Publié: 17 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 18 Janvier 2012 - Publication: CKOM News Talk Radio 650

Lien http://ckom.com/story/truth-and-reconciliation-commission-hearing-underway-regina/39888

Conrad Burns of the James Smith Cree Nation near Prince Albert says residential schools took away his dad's ability to care and to be a father, by ripping him from his family.

Burns testified Tuesday, as the son of a residential school survivor, at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission hearing in Regina.
 


Residential school victims speak out

Publié: 18 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 18 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Regina Leader-Post

Lien http://www.leaderpost.com/news/todays-paper/Residential+school+victims+speak/6011453/story.html

In preparation for the Saskatchewan National Event that is to happen in June in Saskatoon, the TRC will be hosting 12 community hearings. The first of the hearings took place at First Nations University in Regina. The three-day event concludes today.

At the hearings, survivors speak publicly about their experience at residential school and what kind of impact that experience has had on their lives. For many it's a very emotional experience.


Le programme d'information publique et de défense des intérêts favorise la guérison et la réconciliation

Publié: 17 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 18 Janvier 2012 - Publication: AANDC

Lien http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/fra/1326830241825/1326830364114

Ottawa (Ontario), le 17 janvier 2012 – L'honorable John Duncan, ministre des Affaires autochtones et du développement du Nord canadien, a lancé aujourd'hui un appel de propositions pour le financement de 2012-2013 du Programme d'information publique et de défense des intérêts (PIPDI).

Le programme, qui en est à sa sixième année, travaille avec des partenaires afin d'appuyer le partage des renseignements et d'assurer que la collectivité autochtone, particulièrement les anciens élèves des pensionnats et leurs familles, connaissent tous les aspects de la Convention de règlement relative aux pensionnats indiens.

De plus, les propositions présentées au PIPDI doivent comprendre des mesures visant à recourir aux réseaux existants pour communiquer l'information aux anciens élèves au sujet de la date limite du 19 septembre 2012 pour présenter une demande auprès du Processus d'évaluation indépendant ainsi qu'au sujet des autres éléments contenus dans la Convention de règlement relative aux pensionnats indiens.


Advocacy and Public Information Program Promoting Healing and Reconciliation

Publié: 17 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 18 Janvier 2012 - Publication: AANDC

Lien http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1326830241825

Ottawa, Ontario (January 17, 2012) – The Honourable John Duncan, Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development, today launched a call for proposals for the 2012-2013 funding for the Advocacy and Public Information Program (APIP).

In its sixth year, the program works with partners to support the sharing of information and to ensure that the Aboriginal community, particularly former residential school students and their families, are aware of all aspects of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement.

In addition, APIP proposals must include efforts to use their existing networks to inform former students of September 19, 2012, Independent Assessment Process application deadline and other components of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement.


Residential Schools: the full story

Publié: 18 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 18 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Regina Leader-Post

Lien http://www.leaderpost.com/life/Residential+schools+full+story/6011432/story.html

The tragic history of Canada's 130-year Indian residential school system has generated so many public inquiries, commissions, articles, books and radio and TV documentaries some might think there's nothing else to be learned.

It pains us to say it, but too many nonaboriginal Canadians are either ignorant of the past - or in outright denial. They look at the sad economic and social plight of many aboriginal people today and wonder why they just can't "pull themselves together".

The answer lies in the past. We owe it to those who died in residential schools and those who survived to learn the facts so the nation truly can heal its relationship with aboriginal people - and achieve the commission's goal of a new understanding based on "mutual respect".


Indian Residential School Hearings Begin In Saskatchewan

Publié: 16 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 17 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Saskatoonhomepage.ca

Lien http://www.saskatoonhomepage.ca/indian-residential-school-hearings-begin-in-saskatchewan/itemid_21

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada is holding 12 community hearings in Saskatchewan ending with a National event in Saskatoon in June.

The first community hearing began today and runs through Wednesday in Regina.

Commissioner Marie Wilson, with the TRC, says the goal is to hear and share as many stories as possible to get a better understanding of what this experience meant and did to people, the lasting impact it has had, and what lessons we can learn from it.


Truth commission begins Saskatchewan hearings

Publié: 16 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 17 Janvier 2012 - Publication: CBC

Lien http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/story/2012/01/16/sk-truth-reconciliation-regina.html

Former residential school students in Saskatchewan can share their stories with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission over the next few months.

The commission, which is gathering stories from aboriginal people across Canada about the residential schools experience, began community hearings in Regina on Monday.

The Regina hearings, which run until Wednesday, allow former students to talk about what they went through at the church-run, government-funded schools.


Sasakanoose to join Hall: Ex-NHLer touched by honour

Publié: 17 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 17 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Saskatoon Star-Phoenix

Lien http://www.thestarphoenix.com/sports/Sasakamoose+join+Hall/6005736/story.html

Life ricocheted Fred Sasakamoose from a northern reserve, to a Saskatchewan residential school, to the NHL, and beyond.

The 78-year-old retiree said Monday that he's not ready to die yet - not with the brand-new Saskatchewan Hockey Hall of Fame planning to make him an inaugural inductee on July 28 in Swift Current, alongside greats like Gordie Howe and the Bentley brothers.

"My moment of life could (end), maybe, tomorrow," Sasakamoose said Monday from his home on the Sandy Lake Reserve. "But July 28, another six months from now ... I want to live that far. I want to be able to receive that accomplishment, and to meet the people who are there. I want to be there in Swift Current, and I want to be part of it."


Federal official wanted emails deleted outlining plan to stonewall on residential school genocide questions

Publié: 13 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 16 Janvier 2012 - Publication: APTN

Lien http://aptn.ca/pages/news/2012/01/13/federal-official-wanted-emails-deleted-outlining-plan-to-stonewall-on-residential-school-genocide-questions/

Federal Aboriginal Affairs officials planned to stonewall and avoid public questions about comments made by their minister, emails obtained by APTN National News show.

The internal government documents also show a communications manager wanted to delete those emails, which discussed the department’s plan on dealing with fallout from controversial comments Minister John Duncan made about Indian residential schools.

Duncan ignited outrage last fall among many former residential school students when he said the system was the result of an “education policy gone wrong.”

He also said he didn’t believe the residential school system was an act of genocide, but admitted that if continued it would have been “lethal” to First Nations culture.

“I don’t view it that way (as an act of cultural genocide), but it was certainly very negative to the retention of culture and if it had extended for another generation or two it might have been lethal, yes,” said Duncan.

Duncan made the comments in October while announcing his government would be commissioning a stained-glass window in honour of residential school students and install it on Parliament Hill.


Brève histoire des pensionnats indiens

Publié: 13 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 16 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Site web de la Conférence des évêques catholiques du Canada

Lien http://www.cccb.ca/site/frc/eglise-au-canada-et-ailleurs/leglise-catholique-au-canada/les-peuples-autochtones/3206-breve-histoire-des-pensionnats-indiens

La participation catholique à la fondation et à l’opération des pensionnats indiens s’insère dans une longue tradition d’engagement catholique dans les domaines de l’éducation, de la santé et du ministère spirituel auprès des Canadiens autochtones et non autochtones.

Mis en place par le gouvernement fédéral au dix-neuvième siècle, le système des pensionnats indiens fut dès lors financé essentiellement par des fonds publics, supervisé par des agents du gouvernement et opéré principalement par diverses Églises chrétiennes – notamment par des diocèses et des communautés religieuses catholiques. Le système des pensionnats indiens se fondait, en principe, sur l’obligation pour l’État de fournir des services d’éducation aux enfants autochtones; en pratique, cependant, la politique a souvent visé à assimiler une population dans laquelle on ne voyait à tort qu’un obstacle au progrès du pays.  


Brief History of Indian Residential Schools

Publié: 13 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 16 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops web site

Lien http://www.cccb.ca/site/eng/church-in-canada-and-world/catholic-church-in-canada/indigenous-peoples/3206-brief-history-of-indian-residential-schools

Catholic involvement in the foundation and operation of Indian residential schools is part of a long tradition of Catholic engagement in education, health and spiritual ministry, both to Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians.

The Indian residential school system was consolidated by the federal government in the nineteenth century, sustained from then on mostly by government funds, overseen by government officials and run primarily by various Christian churches, including some dioceses and religious communities within the Catholic Church.  The Indian residential school system was rooted, in principle, in the government’s obligation to provide education to Indigenous children; in practice, however, the policy was often aimed at assimilating a population often misperceived as merely an obstacle to the nation’s progress.  


Gladue slope remains slippery

Publié: 14 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 16 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Winnipeg Free Press

Lien http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/opinion/westview/gladue-slope--remains-slippery-137339613.html

The Supreme Court's Gladue decision is 13 years old and is as wrong today as it was then. Rendered by the best of Canadian legal minds, the decision is not only wrong-headed, it's been ineffective.

The groundbreaking ruling was hailed as a way to reduce the over-representation of aboriginal people in jail. But instead of taking measures to reduce the amount of crime committed by aboriginal offenders, the Supreme Court took a simpler route -- some suggest an embarrassingly simple route.

It tried to reduce jailed aboriginal numbers to politically acceptable levels by deflecting away from personal responsibility and focusing on the plight and "systemic or background factors which may have influenced (aboriginal people) to engage in criminal conduct." The message was clear: If the offender is aboriginal, find alternatives to jail.


Truth and Reconciliation Commission to visit Hay River reserve

Publié: 13 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 16 Janvier 2012 - Publication: CJCD Mix 100

Lien http://www.mix100.ca/news/news/Local/12/01/13/Truth-and-Reconciliation-Commission-to-visit-HR-Reserve

March 8 is set to be a big day for the K'atlodeeche First Nation.

Survivors of residential schools on the Hay River Reserve will get a chance to make a statement to the Truth and Reconciliation Committee.


CBC programming sheds light on impacts of residential schools

Publié: 13 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 16 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Truth and Reconciliation Commission web site

Lien http://www.trc.ca/websites/trcinstitution/index.php?p=3

The first episode of the CBC Television documentary series 8th Fire, Indigenous in the City, aired on Thursday night, January 12. The series examines issues such as the Residential School system and its impacts on today’s generation of Aboriginal peoples in Canada. To watch episode one, click here.

Part of the 8th Fire project, CBC Radio series Trailbreakers also made its debut. The series follows Don Kelly speaking with Aboriginal change-makers like Don Worme and Cindy Blackstock.

Current affairs radio program The Current recently examined the phenomenon of absent Aboriginal fathers during a town-hall in Whitehorse, Yukon. Listen to the town-hall Fathers
without fathers: Aboriginal men in Canada
.


Labrador Residential School Challenge

Publié: 13 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 16 Janvier 2012 - Publication: CBC

Lien http://www.cbc.ca/labradormorning/episodes/2012/01/13/labrador-residential-schools-challenge/

People who attended residential schools in Labrador are challenging the Government of Canada. Last month, the province’s Court of Appeal green lighted a class action lawsuit to proceed Former students want the federal government to recognize them. Labrador Metis, Innu and Inuit are currently excluded from the residential schools settlement act. Danny Pottle is a Nunatsiavut Government spokesperson. He’s on the line from St. John’s to tell us more about the Newfoundland and Labrador Residential schools class action. (MP3 audio file of 5:37 in duration follows.)


Were Aboriginals forced to go to residential schools

Publié: 14 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 16 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Yahoo! Canada Answers

Lien http://ca.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20120114150924AA01j5t

Open Question (msBLAH):

What were some of the things they did there?

& how long did they stay there for?
  • 2 days ago
  • - 2 days left to answer.

Answers (1 - jewle8417)

  • 2 days ago

TRC Community Hearing - Prince Albert

Publié: 12 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 12 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Truth and Reconciliation Commission web site

Lien http://www.myrobust.com/websites/trcinstitution/File/pdfs/Hearing%20Poster_Prince%20Albert_01-10-2012.pdf

TRC Community Hearing – Prince Albert

In preparation for the Saskatchewan National Event in June 2012, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) will be in Prince Albert, SK

January 31-February 2, 2012

Location: Prince Albert Indian & Métis Friendship Centre

1409 First Avenue East, Prince Albert, SK


This Week

Publié: 12 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 12 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Toronto Star

Lien http://www.toronto.com/article/709741--the-week-january-12-to-18

Our critics' picks for January 12 to 18...

GALLERIES

   Carl Beam was both a ferocious critic of late-colonial oppression and a virtuosic artist whose multimedia gifts had few boundaries. He used those gifts to become one of Canada's best-known aboriginal artists, and as a platform for his rage at the injustice of a system that marginalized his people and confined so many of them, including himself, to the nightmare of the residential school system. On Thursday, Aakideh, which means "brave one" in Beam's native Ojibway, screens at the McMaster Gallery of Art in Hamilton, and if you didn't have a chance to see it at its Toronto premiere at last year's Reel Artists Film Festival, consider the trip. It's a powerful, moving, complex portrait of a man who was all of those things, and more. (Thursday 6 p.m., McMaster University Art Gallery, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton.)


TRC Community Hearing - Key First Nation

Publié: 12 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 12 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Truth and Reconciliation Commission web site

Lien http://www.myrobust.com/websites/trcinstitution/File/pdfs/Hearing%20Poster_Key%20First%20Nation_01-11-2012.pdf

TRC Community Hearing – Key First Nation

In preparation for the Saskatchewan National Event in June 2012, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) will be in Key First Nation, SK

January 20-22, 2012

Location: Key Band Hall


Mental health service backlog in Mackenzie Delta: Long wait times, increased caseload after summer TRC event

Publié: 10 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 11 Janvier 2012 - Publication: CBC

Lien http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/story/2012/01/10/north-nwt-mental-health-backlog.html

People in the Mackenzie Delta are growing frustrated with a backlog for counselling in the region.

Long wait times and an increased caseload are contributing to the problem, especially after hundreds travelled to Inuvik, N.W.T., in June for a Truth and Reconciliation Commission national event.

Those who made the journey were told they would receive support from Health Canada when the event was over.

But as CBC News found out, that support is not always available.

“What we have to recognize is that this has been a war zone,” said TRC Commissioner Marie Wilson.

She said the past 150 years have killed and damaged spirits in the aboriginal community. She said it's going to take extraordinary resources to set that right.

“I think we have to revise our expectations around that if we think that this is going to be a five-year happy project and then everyone's going to be okay. It could never be that,” said Wilson. “How could it ever be that when we are hearing stories and details of some of the most devastating things that Canada has ever done to itself and its citizens?” she asked.


Lesson learned, now for the next step

Publié: 11 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 11 Janvier 2012 - Publication: The Telegram

Lien http://www.thetelegram.com/Opinion/Columns/2012-01-11/article-2860260/Lesson-learned,-now-for-the-next-step/1

The sordid legacy of residential schools has left a lasting scar on the relationship between native populations and the rest of us who — fairly or not — have inherited the sins of European settlers.

It is difficult to even broach the subject of native education without unwittingly fashioning a stick for your back.

But a Senate committee has been doing exactly that, and its conclusions and recommendations — released in December, but overshadowed by the crisis at Ontario’s Attawapiskat reserve — point towards a fundamental shift in the way native populations in this country will be schooled.

It’s a new approach that appears to be supported — at least in principle — by Assembly of First Nations Chief Shawn Atleo, and by a wide swath of band councils across Canada.


Blind Spot uncovered: CBC report sheds light on important issues related to absent aboriginal fathers

Publié: 11 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 11 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Regina Leader-Post

Lien http://www.leaderpost.com/life/Blind+Spot+uncovered/5976856/story.html

"How can you be a father if you haven't had a father?"

This seemingly innocuous question becomes more intriguing upon reflection and CBC reporter/producer Geoff Leo is hoping a documentary shot in Regina will shine a spotlight on a subject that has been hidden in plain sight for decades.

Blind Spot: What Happened To Canada's Aboriginal Fathers? not only puts the issue of absent aboriginal fathers under a microscope but also attempts to explain the causes of the crisis, the possible solutions and why the issue has never been addressed nationally.

The most crushing blow to aboriginal families came with the creation of residential schools. Children were sent to these schools, separated from their parents except for summer or holiday visits. While the policy may have been created with the best of intentions, it removed the day-to-day family roles from the aboriginal children - they didn't get to see how a father or mother dealt with their responsibilities and as such were unprepared when they became parents themselves.


Government and First Nations leaders eye education reform

Publié: 09 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 10 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Toronto Sun

Lien http://www.torontosun.com/2012/01/09/government-and-first-nations-leaders-eye-education-reform

Education will be the focus of an upcoming First Nation-Crown gathering this month, but experts on indigenous affairs say the meeting needs to be about solutions and not just more hot air.

Government and aboriginal leaders will meet in Ottawa on Jan. 24 and the one-day gathering will likely serve as a catalyst for more conversation on key issues, including education reform and economic development in First Nation communities.

Experts say reforming reserve education is a complicated undertaking, especially because education has been used to undermine native culture in the past.

Canada's residential school legacy - a government-funded assimilation program - left deep scars with First Nations across Canada. The system, which was in place for 130 years, lasted until 1996 when the remaining schools closed.


First hand memories of residential school

Publié: 09 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 10 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Merritt Herald.com

Lien http://www.merrittherald.com/community/136980008.html

When it comes to residential schools, readers have likely heard the media stories.

Many probably think, “Well, the children had a roof over their head, got three square meals a day — what more could one ask for?”

As an adult, I think of what was done to us. Being taken from our parents without their consent is a criminal act. This kind of act began back in 1847, when it was suggested that the residential schools be set up as a partnership between the government and the churches. Both parties decided the education should be of a religious nature. In 1892, the federal government and the churches entered into a formal partnership.  So, this criminal act of taking children away from their parents began a long time ago and continued until just recently.

Today, if a child is kidnapped, or removed from the parents’ custody without consent, the offender would be put to trial and sentenced.

People might argue we had a roof over our heads, and three square meals per day, but that was not so. We did have a roof over our heads, but we had that at home with our parents. As for three square meals per day, we ate three times, but the food was so little. When we were home, our parents provided very well for us. Why did we need to go to residential school to be hungry and cold?

This is my perspective on residential schools from my experiences as a child. It was not a very nice place to be, especially for young children.


Justice system: One trial's message

Publié: 09 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 09 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Windsor Star

Lien http://www.windsorstar.com/opinion/editorials/Justice+system/5965612/story.html

Crown attorney Alex Paparella wanted the judge to give Richard Smoke a sentence of six to eight years for brutally assaulting a man outside the town of Caledonia in 2007.

For Smoke, a sentence like that should have seemed like a sweet deal. There was no disputing the evidence. It went like this: On a fateful September morning more than four years ago, Sam Gualtieri arrived to work on a house he was building in Sterling Woods, a subdivision just a stone's throw from the area natives had occupied during the Caledonia uprising.

That's why people were stunned last month when Whitten sentenced Smoke to two years and 11 months; in reality less than two years because of time already served.

Since 1999, judges have been told they must take into consideration the historical status of aboriginals, and - perhaps the most important factor - the fact they make up a disproportionate percentage of the prison population. (Using this logic, would aboriginals be sentenced more often if they were found to make up a relatively small percentage of the prison population? Clearly that would be absurd.)

This ruling allowed Smoke's lawyer to introduce issues of systemic racism and the harmful effects of the residential school system, even though Smoke had never spent a day in a residential school. In essence, Smoke was sentenced on historical grounds, not on the facts of the case.

That cannot be allowed to happen. There must be one law for all Canadians, and justice must be meted out fairly. That means the sentence must fit the crime, and in this case, it sadly did not.


Guest column: No justice in leniency shown to aboriginal offenders

Publié: 05 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 05 Janvier 2012 - Publication: The Province

Lien http://www.theprovince.com/opinion/Guest+column+justice+leniency+shown+aboriginal+offenders/5947439/story.html?cid=megadrop_story

According to Canadian law, judges must pay particular attention to the circumstances of aboriginal offenders in order to reduce the overrepresentation of aboriginals in the justice system. They must do so even if aboriginal offenders' lawyers do not raise the issue of their clients' race at trial. They must also make allowance for offenders' status in regard to whether offenders live on or off a reserve.

That has been the reality in Canada's justice system since the Supreme Court of Canada's decision in the case of R. vs. Gladue, which gave broad interpretation to Section 718.2(e) of the Criminal Code (requiring a sentencing judge to consider "all available sanctions other than imprisonment that are reasonable in the circumstances for all offenders, with particular attention to the circumstances of aboriginal offenders"). If this information is new to you, don't worry. The issue of unequal justice in favour of aboriginals seldom comes to the fore because, to be frank, most violent crime committed by aboriginals is committed against other aboriginals. So the issue doesn't pierce non-aboriginal consciousness.

Aboriginals do not need special treatment in court, nor has the special treatment they have received over the past 14 years done much to reduce the rates of aboriginal crime or violence. Moreover, while aboriginals may be over-represented in prison relative to their share of the population (21% of prisoners versus 4% of the population), they are not over-represented relative to their involvement in crimes. About one-in-five crimes in which the race of the suspect is identified is committed by an aboriginal, just as about one-in-five prisoners is aboriginal.


Stay Tuned: 10 Big Aboriginal Stories for 2012

Publié: 04 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 05 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Indian Country

Lien http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2012/01/04/stay-tuned-10-big-stories-for-2012-70474

Canada’s aboriginals face a multitude of issues in 2012, as always. Some of these have been grabbing headlines for quite some time, others more recently. Below are 10 stories that are sure to be at the forefront.

8. Residential Schools. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada continues its hearings, with two years left in its mandate, and begins viewing proposals for a national research center. Meanwhile, schools around the country are still looking for status as residential schools, and some lawsuits are being filed. The year will see many developments.


TRC Community Hearing - Regina

Publié: 04 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 05 Janvier 2012 - Publication: Truth and Reconciliation Commission web site

Lien http://www.trc.ca/websites/trcinstitution/File/Hearing%20Poster_Regina_01-03-2012.pdf

TRC Community Hearing - Regina

In preparation for the Saskatchewan National Event in June 2012, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) will be in Regina, SK:

January 16, 17, 18, 2012

Location: First Nations University of Canada

1 First Nations Way, Regina, SK


Native Canadians deserve the Gladue court

Publié: 05 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 05 Janvier 2012 - Publication: National Post

Lien http://www.nationalpost.com/todays-paper/Native+Canadians+deserve+Gladue+court/5948691/story.html

GThe federal government's omnibus crime bill will impose mandatory minimum sentences for some drug and sex offences. The consequence of that legislation will be that restorative justice (family group conferences, healing circles) will be compromised, if not terminated altogether.

In June 2008, Prime Minister Stephen Harper apologized to Canada's aboriginals for this country's role in the Indian residential school program. This program aimed at assimilation and to this day is largely responsible for the high rate of aboriginal incarceration. His apology at the time seemed genuine. But was it? Depriving aboriginal offenders of access to the Gladue court is simply mind-boggling, counterproductive and flies in the face of the Prime Minister's apology. Go figure.


Allan Rock, please explain again why we have two-tier justice

Publié: 05 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 05 Janvier 2012 - Publication: National Post

Lien http://www.nationalpost.com/todays-paper/Allan+Rock+please+explain+again+have+tier+justice/5948685/story.html

Re: Gladue Decision's Long Shadow, Christie Blatchford, Jan. 3.

Judge Alan Whitten, in bringing down such an absurdly lenient sentence in the Richard Smoke trial, has thoroughly tarnished his reputation and insulted the intelligence of every right-thinking Canadian. Fear of getting his fingers rapped, presumably by his superiors, as Christie Blatchford suggests, would not appear to be a sufficient excuse for not living up to one's duty as a Provincial Court judge no matter what the consequences. Less than two years is totally unacceptable for beating a man to within an inch of his life on private property.


Allan Rock, please explain again why we have two-tier justice

Publié: 05 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 05 Janvier 2012 - Publication: National Post

Lien http://www.nationalpost.com/todays-paper/Allan+Rock+please+explain+again+have+tier+justice/5948690/story.html

What concerns me most about this misguided sentence is that it basically gives Richard Smoke permission to wreak criminal havoc as he pleases. He has a permanent excuse, as his and his ancestors' backgrounds will be with him always.


Native attacker gets reduced sentence for ‘vicious’ Caledonia assault

Publié: 2- 2011 - Ajouter: 03 Janvier 2011 - Publication: National Post

Lien http://news.nationalpost.com/2011/12/23/native-attacker-given-reduced-sentence-for-vicious-caledonia-assault/

For beating a non-native builder to within an inch of his life during the fiery native occupation in nearby Caledonia, a young aboriginal man was sentenced to less than two years in jail, plus time served – a punishment that leaves the victim’s family demanding an inquiry into how the courts treat First Nations offenders.

Ontario Superior Court Judge Alan Whitten cited Friday the sad legacy of residential schools and the disproportionately large population of incarcerated aboriginal offenders as reasons why he did not give Richard Smoke a harsher sentence for an attack he described as “senseless and vicious” and “just a notch below culpable homicide.”

The reduced sentence for such a brutal attack – with a stick of lumber on a defenceless man that rendered builder Sam Gualtieri, 56, brain damaged – outraged the Gualtieri family.


Sentence too lenient

Publié: 2- 2011 - Ajouter: 03 Janvier 2011 - Publication: Toronto Sun

Lien http://www.torontosun.com/2011/12/26/worthington-sentence-too-lenient

Maybe Ontario Superior Court Judge Alan Whitten thought he was doing his bit to right wrongs of the past when he sentenced Six Nations resident Richard Smoke to less than two years in jail for nearly beating a Caledonian man to death.

It’s true Whitten called Smoke’s break and entry and beating of builder Sam Gualtieri with a two-by-four a “senseless and vicious” act that was “a notch below culpable homicide.”

But because residential schools for Indians have a bad record, Judge Whitten was more lenient towards Smoke than, say, if victim Sam Gaultieri had defended his house by doing to Smoke, what Smoke did to him.

Surely a crime is a crime, and to reward some offenders with leniency, simply because they are aboriginal, is unfair to society in general and in the long run, unfair to law-abiding aboriginals.


More injustice from Caledonia

Publié: 1- 2011 - Ajouter: 03 Janvier 2011 - Publication: National Post

Lien http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2011/12/27/national-post-editorial-board-more-injustice-from-caledonia/

Sam Gualtieri was a construction worker who was developing four homes at the Stirling South subdivision, located a kilometre from the disputed territory during the native occupation of a land development site near the town of Caledonia, Ont. . On Sept. 13, 2007, Mr. Gualtieri and members of his work crew arrived at one of those houses, and found three natives inside. A confrontation ensued, and Richard Smoke, a then-18-year-old native man, began to fight with Mr. Gualtieri while his underage companions fled. When Mr. Gualtieri’s work crew entered the half-built home, they found him badly injured on the ground, while Smoke beat him with a piece of lumber he was swinging with both arms.

Mr. Gualtieri suffered severe injuries to his face and head, and sustained permanent brain damage. To this day, he has trouble reading, speaks slowly and walks with difficulty. He has not been able to return to work.

Smoke’s lawyer argued that her client was raised in a culture of racism, and negatively impacted by the legacy of the residential school system (of which Smoke himself was never a part, having been born a full 15 years after the last residential school in Ontario closed). She asked Judge Whitten to consider the “aboriginal perspective” when determining Smoke’s sentence.

Consider it, Judge Whitten most certainly did. For a vicious assault on an unarmed man who was going about his lawful business on private property, Smoke was sentenced to only two years and 11 months. With time served, Smoke will serve less than two years behind bars for a crime even Judge Whitten believes was barely below intentional murder.

Judges can consider the unique circumstances of natives, but should remember that the rest of Canadian society must feel as though their court system takes lawlessness seriously, no matter the skin colour of the perpetrator. Locking Smoke up for less than two years sends precisely the opposite message.


Bad logic behind light Caledonia sentence

Publié: 02 Janvier 2012 - Ajouter: 03 Janvier 2012 - Publication: National Post

Lien http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2012/01/02/christie-blatchford-bad-logic-behind-light-caledonia-sentence/

When in court in Cayuga, Ont., two days before Christmas, a young native man was sentenced to less than two years in prison for the near-fatal beating of builder Sam Gualtieri, something called the Gladue decision was cited by the judge.

It mitigated the sentence given the young man, a 22-year-old named Richard Smoke, who was convicted of an aggravated assault the judge described as “just a notch below culpable homicide.”

It had something of the flavour of the person who kills his parents and then throws himself upon the mercy of the court as an orphan: Mr. Smoke, went this logic, nearly beat Mr. Gualtieri to death because of the pain he had suffered as a native person in a racist culture and therefore should qualify for a lighter sentence.

In Mr. Smoke’s case, the court was told his grandparents had residential school experience, that native students at his high school had been affected by racism during the Caledonia dispute and that the atmosphere in the community may have forced him into uncharacteristic behaviour: In other words, they made him do it and now they, not he, should pay.